Pennsylvania Abolition Society papers


Collection 0490

1751-1992, undated; bulk 1780-1930
(40.0 Linear feet ; 81 boxes, 60 volumes, 6 flat files)

Summary Information

Repository
The Historical Society of Pennsylvania
Creator
Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery.
Title
Pennsylvania Abolition Society papers
ID
0490
Date
1751-1992, undated; bulk 1780-1930
Extent
40.0 Linear feet ; 81 boxes, 60 volumes, 6 flat files
Author
Finding aid prepared by Timothy Dewysockie, Megan Sheffer Evans, Cary Hutto
Language
English
Abstract
Growing out of egalitarian concerns of members of the Society of Friends, the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, as it is now known, was founded in 1775 as the Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage, but the Revolution caused its early Quaker members to suspend operations until 1784, when it reorganized with a broader base. From the beginning, the Abolition Society's programs were devoted not only to the abolition of slavery, but to the social and economic improvement of Black Americans as well. This collection of records documents the Pennsylvania Abolition Society's history and its work from mid 1700s to the 1990s, and particularly during the 1800s, through minutes and reports, manumissions and indentures, correspondence, financial papers, and a significant assortment of miscellaneous papers from other anti-slavery and humanitarian organzations.

Preferred citation

Cite as: [Indicate cited item or series here], Pennsylvania Abolition Society papers (Collection 490), The Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

Return to Table of Contents »


Background note

The following represents the full text of the “Historical Sketch” in A Guide to the Microfilm Publication of The Papers of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society at The Historical Society of Pennsylvania  by Jeffrey Nordlinger Bumbrey (1976). The text was lightly edited to meet HSP's current finding aid standards, but the original grammar and formatting remains intact throughout.

The Pennsylvania Abolition Society had its origins in early anti-slavery activities of Philadelphia Quakers. The exhortations of John Woolman and Anthony Benezet had convinced many Friends that the egalitarian and humanitarian doctrines of the Quaker must be extended to include the enslaved black man. It was Quaker conscience, rather than civic consciousness, that led Friends to form an abolition society in 1775.

Friends were not alone in voicing this concern. During 1772 and 1773 “the Clergy of the church of England and Dissenters,” according to Anthony Benezet, “freely joined” Friends in petitions to the Pennsylvania Assembly against the importation of slaves. The Assembly responded by appointing a select committee on February 4, 1773, to draft an act that would perpetuate the £20 duty on slaves. But the passage of the act was hardly the victory that Friends and their allies sought. Later that year they faced another, more immediate, challenge that gave direction to their anti-slavery efforts.

In 1773, Benjamin Bannarman, a resident of Virginia, purchased an Indian woman named Dinah Nevil and her four children from Nathaniel Lowry of New Jersey. Bannarman arranged for his newly-acquired slaves to be delivered in Philadelphia. However, on their arrival, Nevil protested publicly that she and her children were “free people.” She apparently found sympathetic support, for the mayor of Philadelphia intervened and transferred her and the children to the city’s Work House to await legal hearing on the case. Under the leadership of Israel Pemberton, a group of Quaker citizens entered a suit on behalf of Dinah Nevil, requesting the court to void Bannarman’s claims. This case occupied the attention of Friends and the courts for two years, at the end of which the court declared Dinah Nevil and her children were slaves.

The court’s decision and the increasing incidence of similar cases involving blacks who claimed to be free prompted ‘several citizens…to meet and forme themselves into a Society…the relive others that might have Legal Claime to Freedom and were deprived thereof.”

The newly formed Society met periodically during 1775, continuing in its attempts to release Dinah Nevil, and intervening in similar cases involving free blacks. In November, however, formal meetings ceased. Because sixteen of the original twenty-four members were Quakers, the Society decided that Quaker pacifism might discredit or render ineffective the Society’s anti-slavery testimony. Philadelphia was a small city in 1775; nearly everyone knew the religious backgrounds of the members of the Abolition Society. After Lexington and Concord, few could comprehend or respect the peace testimony of the Quaker minority. The Abolition Society itself might have been tainted by the views of some of its members. And, within the Society of Friends, neutrality became a more vexing question than slavery. In the face of confiscations and exile, most Friends withdrew from all public service. The Abolition Society languished in consequence.

Between 1775 and 1784, some programs initiated by the Abolition Society were continued by a few members acting as individuals. Although most historians note that the Abolition Society had no part in securing passage of the Pennsylvania Gradual Emancipation Law in 1780, Anthony Benezet waged a strong campaign in its favor. The new statute, flawed as it was, was to provide both the impetus and framework for much of the Abolition Society’s work for the next two decades. The law provided that no child born in Pennsylvania should be a slave, but that children born of slave mothers should be bound servants until the age of twenty-eight. Persons already enslaved were to be registered by their masters before November 1780; unregistered slaves were to be set free. The Abolition Society worked tirelessly to ensure that this newly-created class of bound servants would receive their legal rights. The Act also stipulated that blacks, whether free or slave, were equal before the law. To be sure, a slave could not be a witness against a freeman, but blacks were now legal persons whose rights had to be protected. Despite its weaknesses, the Act encouraged Benezet and other members of the dormant Abolition Society to continue their efforts. In 1781 they secured the freedom of Dinah Nevil. Thomas Harrison, secretary of the Society in 1775, into whose care Nevil and her children had been committed, purchased the family with his own funds and manumitted them. Continued opposition of the courts to Nevil’s claims left Harrison no alternative, but he and the others realized that individual efforts would be costly and ineffective. The aging Benezet tried several times to revitalize the Society between 1781 and 1783, but to no avail. Even after the effective end of hostilities between Britain and the colonies in 1781, Pennsylvania Quakers were uncertain of their future. Many were attempting to recover confiscated property and most were dismayed at finding themselves disfranchised by the new state government’s test act.

Not until 1784 did the few remaining members call a meeting for the reestablishment of the society. Their motivation was a cause célèbre involving two free black men accused of being runaway slaves. In the summer of 1783, while awaiting trial in the Philadelphia work House, these men unsuccessfully appealed to several influential citizens to act on their behalf. With no hope for assistance or a verdict in their favor, both men committed suicide rather than live as slaves. The immediate reaction in Philadelphia, especially among Friends, was one of shock and anger. None was more enraged by these events than Benezet who, in the last few months of his life, publicized the circumstances behind the suicides, which prompted Thomas Harrison, James Starr. Thomas Meredith, and seventeen others to call a meeting of the society after nine years.

One of the Society’s first acts was to organize its Standing Committee whose members devoted particular attention to manumission, indentures, and petitions to the Confederation Congress.

Reasons why they found it necessary to reorganize and broaden the Society’s membership and appeal remain unclear, but they nevertheless approved a new constitution on April 23, 1787, just a few weeks before the Federal Convention began its deliberations in Philadelphia.

From the moment of its reorganization the Society took on the pragmatic, nonsectarian cast that has characterized it since. The reorganized Society invited a number of non-Quakers to join and elected Benjamin Franklin, the president of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania and member of the Constitution Convention, as president. The broadened membership later included such well-known individuals as Tench Coxe, Thomas Paine, John Jay, Noah Webster, Dr. Benjamin Rush, and the Marquis de Lafayette. The new members brought not only credibility but a new, more pragmatic program to the Society. A modern historian, Winthrop Jordon, has argued that the enactment of the several gradual emancipation statues in Pennsylvania (1780), in Rhode Island and Connecticut (1784), and in New York (1799) blunted the anti-slavery thrust of the PAS and its sister societies. It seems, rather, that the PAS redirected its efforts to meliorative ends; in 1787 it changed its name to the Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery and for Improving the Conditions of the African Race. Thus, in a 1789 Address to the Public the Society noted that the newly emancipated black was “poor and friendless,” and that “under such circumstances, freedom may often prove a misfortune to himself, and prejudicial to society.” Thus the Society intended to

instruct, to advise, to qualify those who have been restored to freedom, for the exercise and enjoyment of civil liberty, to promote in them habits of industry, to furnish them with employments… and to procure their children an education calculated for their future situation in life.

Although the reorganized Society sought support within the Philadelphia community for their efforts, the members clearly thought of their organization as an instrument of relief, instruction and social control; there were to be no free or emancipated blacks amongst its members for two generations. It seems probable that to some members of the Society such memberships would have been unnecessarily radical; after all, in 1787 Richard Allen, Absalom Jones, and other prominent blacks had organized themselves into the Free African Society.

Located in Philadelphia, soon to be the seat of the Federal government, and with such prominent members as Franklin and Rush, the Abolition Society had become the model for similar organizations elsewhere: in 1785 New Yorkers formed a manumission society, followed in quick succession by the banding together of abolitionists in Wilmington, Delaware (1788); Washington County, Pennsylvania (1790); Maryland (1790); and Connecticut (1790). By 1792 abolition groups were scattered from Massachusetts to Virginia, and the Society maintained an immense and constant correspondence with them. The Society corresponded, too, with such foreign organizations, as the Society Instituted for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade at London (1787) and La Société des Amis des Noirs a Paris (1788).

Because of its varied contacts, the Abolition Society was often called upon to act as guardian for manumitted blacks unprepared to live as free men. For example, hundreds of freed slaves were once sent by their former masters from the West Indies to Philadelphia under the sponsorship of the Society. The first such instance occurred in 1795. David Barclay, a prominent English Quaker, received thirty-two slaves in Jamaica in discharge of a debt. Barclay initially intended merely to manumit the slaves, but white Jamaicans feared that the freed might become public charges even if they did not become public nuisances. Instead, arrangements were made with Barclay’s friends, James Pemberton, President of the Society, and Thomas Harrison, Chairman of the Acting Committee, that those blacks willing to emigrate should be transported to Philadelphia and placed in the care of the Abolition Society. In all, twenty-eight of Barclay’s manumitted blacks came to Philadelphia and were put out as apprentices. The success of this venture was repeated in 1800 when the United States Admiralty Court placed 126 African survivors from two captures schooners, The Prudent and  The Phoebe, under the supervision and care of the Society. Like the Jamaican blacks, these people were also placed as bound servants. Despite the happy solutions in both of these cases, no one in the Abolition Society believed that Pennsylvania alone could furnish asylum for large numbers of liberated blacks without greatly antagonizing the local white community, and increasingly in the early nineteenth century the Society found itself compelled to refuse help to unwanted manumitted blacks from other states.

During the last years of the eighteenth century, the Pennsylvania Abolition Society mounted an attack against the slave trade, and against slavery itself. In 1787 they memorialized the Federal Convention in Philadelphia requesting the termination of the slave trade. In the following year they petitioned the Pennsylvania Legislature to stop the traffic in slaves from Philadelphia. Despite the fact that neither appeal brought the immediate relief they sought, the Society continued to work toward its objectives within the legal system in a quiet, persistent, orderly fashion. For the members of the Society sought to correct the imperfections of the existing social order, not to create a new one.

If lobbying and memorializing failed to produce a needed law, justice was sought by the strict enforcement of existing laws. The Acting Committee, established in 1787 by the Society, gathered information on kidnappings, alleged slave schooners, and especially compliance with Pennsylvania’s abolition laws of 1780 and 1788; the clause which required slaves to be registered was often ignored or carelessly fulfilled. Such technical violations were frequently used to the advantage of blacks; members first recorded them and then brought the violations to the attention of the Society’s lawyers. So varied did their practice become that in 1793, in conjunction with the Acting Committee, the Society’s attorneys compiled the earliest collection of Pennsylvania's slave legislation.

In 1789 members of the Society had moved again to place the business of their organization on a more orderly footing. They secured a charter of incorporation from the State as The Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully held in Bondage, and for Improving the Condition of the African Race.

In the following year they acted upon the promise contained in their new title. The growing number of uneducated poor among the city’s free black population led them to appoint a Committee for Improving the Condition of Free Negroes.The committee took over the job of the old Committee on Education and, in 1794, established a school for black males. They also directed a census of the city’s black community in the same year.

The several successes of 1794 and the presence of the Federal government at Philadelphia prompted the Abolition Society to issue a call to its sister organizations to join in an “American Convention of Delegates from the Abolition Societys [sic] established in different parts of the United States.” Nine organizations sent twenty-five members who, in the words of Winthrop Jordan, “proceeded to memorialize everyone, including their own membership.” In large measure the Convention was the creature of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society and, as such, never really captured the enthusiasm of all of the societies whose local, particular needs militated against a strong national organizations. The Convention continued to meet, off and on, until 1838.

Reasons for the failure of the Convention are not hard to find: after 1798 the New England societies sent no delegates, and within a few years the Maryland and Virginia societies became moribund. By 1804 the Convention had accomplished much of its stated purpose: every state north of Delaware had enacted gradual emancipation laws or had outlawed slavery in their constitutions. And in the South the development of the cotton gin, the reorganization of Southern agriculture, and the availability of new lands in the Deep South and West hardened already established regional feelings against abolitionism.

Thrown back on itself, the Pennsylvania Abolition Society busied itself once again with its Philadelphia constituents. In 1813 they erected a school building on Cherry Street, Clarkson Hall. In the 1820s the Society cooperated with the newly-formed Free-Association and, more importantly, conducted a second census of the city’s blacks and expanded educational facilities for their children. Indeed, throughout the antebellum period, the Society continued to carry out its program of manumission, legal protection, and education of blacks in order to facilitate their assimilation by the larger society. Thus, in 1843, they founded the Lombard Street Infants School as an aid for working parents.

The practical experience and philosophical commitment of most members of the Society to gradual assimilation was first challenged in 1818 by the creation of the American Colonization Society. The Society’s minutes show that although colonization proposals came before the membership, they were certainly not supported. Nor, unfortunately, do they appear to have been condemned. More serious challenges to the Abolition Society’s leadership in anti-slavery movement arose in the 1830s. On October 29, 1835, the Tappan brothers of New York issued a call to anti-slavery sympathizers of all stripes to convene in Philadelphia on December 4. The presidency of the convention was offered to one of the Society’s members, Roberts Vaux, who declined. Vaux’s decision, undoubtedly supported by his fellow Abolition Society members, threw the convention into some confusion but they soon reorganized and chose William Lloyd Garrison with two others to draft a “Declaration of Sentiments” for the new American Anti-Slavery Society. It is easy to comprehend Vaux’s and the Abolition Society’s aversion to the immediatist appeals of the Anti-Slavery Society; the half-century of the Abolition Society’s experience had been predicated on gradualism and assimilation from free blacks into a whole society, not the creation of a new social order.

But with the creation of the America Anti-Slavery Society, leadership in the Abolition movement passed from the PAS. The immediatist message of the anti-slavery advocates unfortunately hardened public opinion against the anti-slavery societies and the Abolition Society’s headquarters, Pennsylvania Hall, causing some members of the Abolition Society to examine their consciences. Some deserted the Society for more immediatist organizations, while others agreed with William Rawle’s reaffirmation of gradualism:

The objects of this association were temperate, legitimate, and correct—they were substantially confined to the limits of our own state—much good was done—colored people suffering by reason of fraud or unlawful violence were relieved—the pursuits of them by persons falsely claiming rights to their services were judiciously repelled—their youth educated—their industry assisted—in sickness they were aided—and in the hour of death they were solaced and supported. In all this no offense was given to the citizens of their other states. Their boundaries were respected, and their laws and constitutions not attempted to be violated. A belief was entertained that an abhorrence of slavery would gradually work its way, and that it was the duty of the Society [to] await the event.

Withdrawal from the mainstream of the American abolition movement did not render the Abolition Society insensitive to the problems of slavery nationally. The Acting Committee continued its caseload as much as it could, investigating kidnappings, informing blacks of their legal rights, and securing counsel for those unable to afford it. As a group, members subsidized the printing of anti-slavery tracts for national distribution, and cooperated with such organizations as the Young Men’s Anti-Slavery Society, the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society, and the Junior Anti-Slavery Society. Memorials were sent to the U. S. Congress to protest slavery in the District of Columbia in 1835 and in 1848, the annexation of Texas in 1842, and the Compromise of 1850 which strengthened the Fugitive Slave act. In 1854, it demanded the admission of Kansas as a free state and sent numerous petitions to Congress asking for an end to the interstate slave trade. In Pennsylvania, the Society organized a powerful lobby in the state legislature against a move to disfranchise free blacks in 1838, and consistently demanded a repeal of all state laws upholding the rights of nonresident slaveholders.

During the years immediately preceding the Civil War, the Abolition Society, again increasingly Quaker, occupied a delicate position. With the rising tide of Northern resentment against abolitionists, membership declined sharply and meetings were frequently cancelled because of threats of violence. The outbreak of the war further weakened the Society and brought considerable dissension within the ranks over Quaker principles versus the northern war effort.

Between 1860 and 1865 the Society made few official refernces to the Civil War. However in 1863, members voted unanimously to enter the full text of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation in the official records. Despite a seeming aloofness to events occurring about it, the Society did become involved with problems caused by the war. As early as 1861, the influx of black refugees into Philadelphia became a matter of concern for municipals officials. Little was done to help them in resettling until 1862 when the Society created a Committee of Employment to secure jobs and homes for as many of the refugees as possible. By 1865, the financial burden of such a large undertaking became apparent, and the Society joined with the Pennsylvania Freedman’s Association and two Quaker groups to form the Freedmen’s Employment Agency. This Agency lasted until 1867 and provided employment for hundreds of freedmen throughout eastern Pennsylvania.

The abolition of slavery and the growth of free educational institutions for blacks achieved two goals of the Society. Consequently, its membership dwindled but did manage, however, to remain moderately active in the 1870s. In conjunction with the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society, support was voiced for the passage of the Fifteenth Amendment in 1870. The Society also campaigned against the exclusion of blacks from Philadelphia’s streetcars, and conducted surveys to determine whether discrimination existed in the public school system. The year 1875 marked the centennial anniversary of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society. By this time, it was the only anti-slavery organization still in existence. The demise of its various schools and the legal expenses incurred by the Acting Committee released a sizeable amount of funds which could be used elsewhere. Initially, appropriations were given to black colleges and grammar schools just being started in the South. The result of this policy was an avalanche of requests from institutions in financial need. Besides giving substantial aid to Howard University, Hampton Institute, and a secondary school at Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, projects in Philadelphia were subsidized, such as a black orphanage and a YMCA in a block neighborhood.

By the end of the nineteenth century, the Society increasingly became a source of funds for organizations and institutions that worked for the relief and education of blacks. It had always supported a number of worthy causes and institutions, but from 1880 on it fell into the custom of regularly funding the Laing School in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina. With each appropriation the Society became more involved with the school’s administration. In 1894, a deed of trust to all the school’s property was given to the society, and two years later it was appointed by the court to be a trustee for an endowment fund given to the school. These developments embroiled the Society in controversies over how to administer the school and its funds for nearly fifty years. In fact, the Laing School and its problems became the main reasons for meetings.

In 1940, the Society ended its trusteeship of the Laing School; the school’s property and $10,000.00 were deeded over to the local school board. Without a major goal to justify their continued existence as an organization, members seriously considered disbanding. Instead, it was voted that the group’s yearly income would be employed in subsidizing programs that otherwise might languish, actively to attract new members, and redefine its concern to concur with present-day needs. It was in keeping with these resolutions that an arrangement was made with the Committee on Race relations of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of the Society of Friends. In return for one half of the Society’s income, to be used to improve race relations, fifteen members of the Committee were to join the Society. Unfortunately, this unusual agreement never worked out, and the Society was forced further to reduce its schedule of meetings.

Though faltering itself, the Society continued to make grants to various projects and individuals filling several critical needs. In the early 1950s, an appeal from the Mercy-Douglas Hospital in Philadelphia brought a contribution allowing that institution to purchase much-needed surgical instruments. Numerous black graduate students were encouraged with stipends to continue their education in social works. High school graduates were brought from the South and sponsored for their entire four years in college. Other grants were given to local Philadelphia organizations, such as the Friends Neighborhood Guild and the Friendship House.

As the civil-rights movement gathered momentum in the late 1950s and 1960s, other organizations again eclipsed the Abolition Society. Individual members were active in advancing racial integration, but the emergence of strong black leadership and organizational efforts clearly made the civil rights movement self-contained. The Society returned to its habit of involvement in areas being neglected. It was the first organization to advance strongly the idea of museum of black culture and history in the Philadelphia school system. In 1970, the Society committed the bulk of its income until 1973 to the Library Company of Philadelphia for the cataloguing of the Vast Afro-American history collection of that institution. And in 1975, in celebration of its own bicentennial, the Society subsidized the microfilming of its records and papers on deposit at [ed: now gifted to] the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

In its two-hundred-year history the Pennsylvania Abolition Society has been undeniably pragmatic, but its commitment to “Improving the Condition of the African race” has been consistent. Dedicated in its earlier years to the education and employment of blacks, the Society has now taken upon itself an even more staggering task: education a whole society about the black experience in America.

Return to Table of Contents »


Scope and content note

The records of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society (PAS) span over two hundred years of the society's history. They comprehensively document the society's many activities, particularly those that occured throughout the late 1700s and the 1800s, though there are records that cover the 20th century as well. The collections consists of administrative records that the society produced and collected during its regular work. Much of the collection is locally or regionally focused in scope, but the records move well beyond the PAS's work in Philadelphia and Pennsylvania, especially when they concern PAS's larger ventures, such as its work with the American Convention and the Liang School in South Carolina. The collection also documents the activities and beliefs of the society as a whole rather than those of its individual members, though some information in that regard can be gleaned from various items in the collection, particularly the correpondence. Additionally, the collection also strongly hightlights abolition and anti-slavery practices of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The manumissions and indentures alone demonstrate well the laws that were then in place concerning former slave oweners and manumitted slaves.

The PAS records have been processed into five series: Minutes and reports (Series 1),  Correspondence (Series 2),  Financial records (series 3),  Manumissions, indentures, and other legal papers (Series 4), and  Miscellaneous papers (Series 5).

The first series contains a mix of bound minute books of the PAS and its various standing and sub committees along with loose minutes and and some loose papers that were removed from the minute books. Primarily, these material cover from the PAS's founding through the mid 1800s, but there is a handful of items dating from the early to mid 20th century.

The second series is comprised of the society's incoming correspondence along with a small amount of outgoing correspondence and third-party letters. The matters covered in these letters vary widely, from political and business issues to personal dealings. Along with formal letters, also in this series are postcards, circulars and form letters, memos, telegrams, and notes. Most of the papers are loose in folders and boxes, but there are two letterbooks dating together from 1789 to 1809. Ranging from the late 1700s to the 1930s, these materials often differ in content and amount. The bulk of the letters date from the nineteenth century, with some gaps. The loose correspondence is arrangened chronologically into incoming and outgoing groups, with undated papers being placed at the ends of those groups.

The third series represents a collection of financial documents produced and collected by the PAS generally and by its committees between the 1790s and the 1930s, with most of the items dating from the ninteenth century. There are bound volumes such as receipt books, ledgers, and subscription books, as well as loose bills, checks, receipts, reports, subscription lists, expense sheets, and letters.

The fourth series consists of volumes, legal documents, and papers pertaining to the society's efforts to assist enslaved and free black people in a myriad of ways from the 1780s to the 1860s. Manumissions and indentures make up the bulk of this series, however there are also court documents; lists of slave ships; birth, marriage and identification certificates; employment permission slips; copies of laws and statutes; legal opinions; materials on unregistered slaves in Pennsylvania; and other documents.

The fifth and final series is made up of a wide array of papers spanning from the 1760s to the 1970s that relate to the PAS and other anti-slavery and humanitarian organizations. Here reserachers will find general member lists, addresses, memorials, and printed matter from the PAS, along with materials pertaining to the various schools and educational institutions initiated and supported by the PAS, such as the Lombard Street Infant School, the Clarkson Institute, and the Laing School. This series also contains census data and records, educational and employment records and statistics, and papers from various organizations such as the American Convention for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and Improving the Conditon of the African Race, the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society, and the Young Men's Anti-Slavery Society, among many others.

Return to Table of Contents »


Administrative Information

Publication Information

 The Historical Society of Pennsylvania ; 2016.

1300 Locust Street
Philadelphia, PA, 19107
215-732-6200

Restrictions

The collection is open for research.

Custodial history

The Society's records were originally maintained by its officers and members, but were then gathered together at Clarkson Hall in 1839, where they remained until the building was sold in 1863. Ten years later they were placed with the Friends' Historical Association where they remained until the 1920s, when they began to come to the Historical Society. Because the officers and members of the Abolition Society frequently held positions with other ameliorative organizations, fragmentary records of other organizations are frequently found among the Abolition Society's records. The Society's records were reorganized on archival principles in 1976, in preparation for the comprehensive microfilm of the records completed that year. The collection was formally made into a gift in 2015.

Provenance

Gift of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, 1992, 2001, 2015.

Processing note

In preparation for the collections' microfiliming in the 1960s, the collection was processed into its current state of five series. Each series contained varying sets of loose papers and volumes. The volumes were given call numbers based on the cataloging methods that were then used by HSP's librarians. When the collection was revisted for further processing, the choice was made to retain the current arrangement of documents and volumes, including the volume's numbering scheme, and clarify that arrangement in a new finding aid. This finding aid is based off of the printed guide to the microfilm (avaible in HSP's library), and it contains a small number of addition to the collection that were donated to HSP from PAS after the original guide was published.

Alternative formats

The collection is available on microfilm: call number XR572.

Return to Table of Contents »


Related Materials

Related materials

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania:

Cox-Parrish-Wharton Papers (Collection 0154)

Leon Gardiner collection of American Negro Historical Society records (Collection 0008)

Parrish and Maxfield Families Photographs (Collection 3713)

Parrish and Pemberton Families Papers (Collection 1653)

Joseph M. Paul Papers (Collection 0192)

Pennsylvania Abolition Society records (Collection 3637)

At other institutions:

New-York Manumission Society Records, 1785-1849 (MS 1465), New-York Historical Society, New York, NY.

Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society records, 1832-1870, New-York Historical Society, New York, NY.

Papers of the Maryland State Colonization Society 1817-1902 (E448 .M393), University of Maryland Special Collections, Hornbake Library, College Park, MD.

Return to Table of Contents »


Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)

  • American Convention for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery and Improving the Condition of the African Race.
  • Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania.
  • Laing School (Mount Pleasant, S.C.).
  • Lombard Street Infant School..
  • Philadelphia Female Anti-slavery Society.

Occupation(s)

  • Antislavery movements--Pennsylvania.
  • Quaker abolitionists--United States--History.

Personal Name(s)

  • Barclay, David.
  • Benezet, Anthony, 1713-1784.

Subject(s)

  • Abolitionists--New Jersey.
  • Abolitionists--Pennsylvania.
  • Abolitionists--United States--Sources.
  • Antislavery movements--New Jersey.
  • Antislavery movements--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia--History--18th century.
  • Antislavery movements--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia--History--19th century.
  • Antislavery movements--United States--History--Sources.
  • Charitable organizations--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia--20th century.
  • Pennsylvania Abolition Society.
  • Quaker abolitionists--History--18th century.
  • Quaker abolitionists--History--19th century.
  • Quaker abolitionists--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia--History.
  • Quakers--Charitable contributions--History.
  • Slavery, abolition, and emancipation.
  • Slavery--Pennsylvania--History--18th century.
  • Slavery--Pennsylvania--History--Sources.
  • Slavery--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia--History--18th century.

Return to Table of Contents »


Collection Inventory

 Series I.  Minutes and reports 

Series description

Series 1, Minutes and reports, contains the following: minutes of the General Meetings, 1775, 1784-1979; minutes of the Acting Committee, 1784-1842; minutes of the Electing Committee, 1790-1826; Committee for Improving the condition of free Blacks, minutes, 1790-1803; Committee of Guardians, 1790-1802; Board of Education, minutes and reports, 1797-1865; Committee on the African Slave Trade, minutes, 1805-1807. Also present in this first series are loose and draft minutes and committee reports.

Box Folder

General meeting minutes 1787-1797 

13 1

General meeting loose minutes and committee reports 1788-1789, 1791-1792, 1794-1798, 1800,1805, 1813, 1819-1820, 1826, 1828, 1834-1836, 1843, 1901, 1911, 1916, 1950 

12A 1
Volume

General meeting minute book 1800-1824 

AmS .011
Box Folder

General meeting minutes 1802-1803, 1805-1807, 1811-1819, 1823 

13 2
Volume

General meeting minute book 1825-1847 

AmS .012

General meeting minute book 1825-1860 

AmS .02
Box Folder

General meeting minutes 1830-1832, 1834-1832, 1834-1841, 1846-1847, undated 

13 3
Volume

General meeting minute book 1847-1916 

AmS .013

General meeting minute book 1916-1932 

AmS .014
Box Folder

Loose documents removed from "General meeting minute book" Ams .014 1914, 1921-1923, 1925-1926, 1929 

12A
Volume

General meeting minute book 1932-1974 

2
Box Folder

General meeting loose minutes and board reports 1952-1953, 1955-1971, 1975 

12A 3-4

General meeting committee reports 1788-1799 

General note

Item-level inventory written on folder.

13 4

General meeting committee reports 1801-1802, 1804, 1809 

General note

Item-level inventory written on folder.

13 5

General meeting committee reports 1812-1819 

General note

Item-level inventory written on folder.

13 6

General meeting committee reports 1820-1822, 1824-1829 

General note

Item-level inventory written on folder.

13 7

General meeting committee reports 1830-1839 

13 8

General meeting committee reports 1843, 1845, 1847 

13 9

General meeting committee reports Undated 

13 10
Volume

Acting committee minute book 1784-1788 

AmS .04

Acting committee minute book 1789-1797 

AmS .0412

Acting committee minute book 1798-1810 

AmS .042
Box Folder

Acting committee minutes 1791, 1794, 1796-1798, 1810-1811, 1825-1826, 1837, undated 

13 11
Volume

Acting committee minute book 1810-1822 

AmS .043

Acting committee minute book 1822-1842 

AmS .044

Committee of guardians minute book 1790-1796 

AmS .07

Committee of guardians minute book 1797-1802 

AmS .071
Box Folder

Electing committee minutes 1788-1796, 1804, 1806-1809, 1812-1814, 1816-1823, 1826, 1829 

13 12
Volume

Electing committee minute book 1790-1826 

AmS .1
Box Folder

Committee of correspondence minutes 1789-1791, 1794, 1810, undated 

13 13

Committee of 24 (or the committee for improving the condition of free blacks) minutes 1790-1792, 1794, 1797, 1799-1801, undated 

13 14
Volume

Committee for improving the condition of free blacks minute book 1790-1803 

AmS .121
Box Folder

Committee on education minutes 1787-1813, 1801, 1803 

13 15

Committee on education; sub-committees reports 1787-1813, 1813 

13 16
Volume

Board of education minute book 1797-1803 

AmS .141

Board of education minute book 1803-1819 

AmS .142
Box Folder

Board of education minutes 1813-1815, 1818-1820, 1829, 1831-1832, 1834-1837, 1840, 1847, 1864, undated 

13 17
Volume

Board of education minute book 1819-1829 

AmS .143

Board of education minute book 1830-1839 

AmS .144

Board of education minute book 1840-1865 

AmS .145
Box Folder

Board of education sub-committee reports 1813-1814 

13 18

Board of education sub-committee reports 1815-1816 

13 19

Board of education sub-committee reports 1817-1818 

13 20

Board of education sub-committee reports 1819-1820 

13 21

Board of education sub-committee reports 1830-1834 

13 22

Board of education sub-committee reports 1835 

13 23

Board of education sub-committee reports 1836-1839 

13 24

Board of education sub-committee reports 1840-1841, 1843-1844, 1846-1847 

13 25

Board of education sub-committee reports 1861-1864, undated 

13 26

Board of education sub-committee reports Undated 

13 27

Board of education committee on employment minutes 1864-1865, undated 

13 28
Volume

Committee of the African slave trade minute book 1805-1807 

AmS .11
Box Folder

Committee on the African slave trade minutes 1805, 1807-1808, 1822 

13 29
Volume

Committee for the Improvement of Colored People minute book 1837-1853 

AmS .132
Box Folder

Committee to improve the condition of the african race minutes 1846-1847, 1849, undated 

13 30

Committee appointed to consult the counsellors of the society minutes 1794 

13 31
Volume

Manuscript history of the PAS, W.J. Buck [3 volumes] Undated 

AmS .001

Extracts of the manuscript collection of the PAS Undated 

AmS .005

The constitution and minutes of the PAS 1787-1800 

AmS .01

Return to Table of Contents »


 Series II.  Correspondence 

Series description

Series 2, Correspondence, contains letters on a variety of political, social, and personal subjects. Correspondents include most of the anti-slavery organization in the United States as well as a number of anti-slavery advocates including Jacques-Pierre Brissott de Warville, Condorcet, William Wilberforce, Benjamin Lundy, Lucretia Mott, and others. The correspondece dates from 1789 to 1979, with the bulk of it dating from 1789 to the late 1800s.

Box Folder

Correspondence, incoming 1784-1795 

14 1-12
Volume

Letterbook 1789-1794 

AmS. 08
Box Folder

Loose correspondence, incoming 1789, 1868, 1913 

12A 5
Volume

Letterbook 1794-1809 

Ams .081
Box Folder

Correspondence, incoming 1796-1805 

15 1-10

A.L.S Thomas Harrison and Robert Patterson (on behalf of the committee appointed to make the black people bound) to George Benson 1806 

15 11

Correspondence, incoming 1806-1819 

15 12-29

Correspondence, incoming 1820-1849, 1857, 1859-1863 

16 1-20

Correspondence, incoming 1864-1869, 1872, 1875, 1897, 1898, 1910-1914, 1918, 1928-1929, 1931, undated 

17 1-13

Correspondence, outgoing 1783, 1786-1795, 1808-1810, 1816, 1819, 1821, 1823, 1826, 1833-1835, 1837, 1858, 1860-1862, 1864-1865, 1913-1914, undated 

18 1-29

Loose correspondence, outgoing 1804 

12A 6

Assorted correspondence, issue of negro history bulletin 1980-1985 

12A 7

Assorted correspondence 1986-1992 

12A 8-9

Return to Table of Contents »


 Series III.  Financial records 

Series description

Series 3, Financial records, contains, among other materials, the following: Treasurer's accounts, 1792-1840, 1937-1949; Board of Education (Committee of 24), 1793-1812, Subscription books, 1813-1821, 1813-1825, 1835-1837, Clarkson School tuition accounts, 1819-1822, 1838; miscellaneous bills, receipts, audits, 1795-1972.

Volume

General meeting treasurer's accounts 1792-1800 

AmS .09

General meeting treasurer's accounts 1792-1812 

AmS .091
Box Folder

General meeting treasurer accounts, audits, letters and reports 1795, 1803, 1805-1819 

19 1
Volume

General meeting treasurer's accounts 1812-1840 

AmS .092
Box Folder

General meeting treasurer accounts, audits, letters and reports 1820-1821, 1823-1839 

19 2

General meeting treasurer annual financial statement 1908-1909 

19 3

General meeting treasurer bills and receipts 1790, 1795, 1799, 1801, 1803-1805, 1807, 1811, 1814-1816, 1818-1823, 1825-1829 

19 4
Volume

General meeting treasurer's receipt book 1795-1811 

AmS .095
Box Folder

General meeting treasurer bills and receipts 1830-1834 

19 5

General meeting treasurer bills and receipts 1835-1839 

19 6

General meeting treasurer tax bills 1811, 1821-1827 

19 7

General meeting treasurer bills and receipts 1840-1841, 1843, 1847, 1859, 1862-1868 

19 8
Volume

General meeting subscription book 1792-1793 

AmS .096

General meeting subscription book 1808-1815 

AmS .098
Box Folder

General meeting treasurer subscription and collection lists, list of arrearages 1784-1787, 1789, 1803-1821, 1837-1838 

19 9

General meeting treasurer accounts, audits, letters, and reports Undated 

19 10

General meeting treasurer accounts, audits, letters and reports 1856, 1859, 1862-1866, undated 

19 11

General meeting treasurer miscellaneous material, includes items relating to debts incurred by an money owed to blacks 1784-1804, 1814, 1864, 1913, 1914, undated 

20 1

General meeting treasurer accounts, receipts, and statements 1920-1951, 1958-1959, 1962-1963, 1965, 1970-1971 

20 2
Volume

General meeting treasurer’s accounts; delinquent tax bill 1918-1937, 1929-1933 

AmS .093
Box Folder

General meeting treasurer's delinquent tax bills [removed from AmS .093] 1929-1933 

20 3
Volume

General meeting treasurer’s accounts; water rent receipts, tax statements 1937-1949, 1938-1939 

AmS .094
Box Folder

General meeting treasurer's water rent receipt and tax statement [removed from AmS .094] 1938-1939 

20 4

General meeting treasurer correspondence, incoming 1926, 1928, 1940-1941, 1955, 1958, 1961-1964, 1971-1972 

20 5

General meeting treasurer correspondence, outgoing 1940, 1959-1960, 1962-1964, 1970-1972 

20 6

Laing School at Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina financial records 1867, 1882, 1909, 1911-1915, 1917, undated 

20 7

Laing School at Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina financial records: tax receipts 1894, 1902-1910 

20 8
Volume

Committee for improving the condition of free blacks [also known as the committee of 24] 1793-1800 

AmS .15
Box Folder

Committee of 24/committee on education treasurer's accounts 1803-1804 

20 9

Committee of education, treasurer: accounts, bills, receipts, and reports 1790-1813, 1796-1806, 1809, 1812 

20 10

Committee on the African slave trade expense sheets 1805-1807 

20 11

Acting committee treasurer: accounts, bills, cancelled checks, and receipts 1784, 1810-1811, 1816-1817, 1822-1827, 1831, 1835 

20 12

Board of education treasurer: accounts, bills, and receipts 1813-1819, 1824, 1826 

20 13

Board of education treasurer: accounts, bills, and receipts 1831-1835 

20 14

Committee of 24 treasurer's accounts, board (committee) of education treasurer's accounts [AmS .151] 1793-1803, 1803-1812 

21 1

Board of education treasurer's accounts [AmS .152] 1805-1812 

21 2

Board of education treasurer: accounts, bills, and receipts 1836-1837 

21 3

Board of education treasurer: accounts, bills, and receipts 1838-1839 

21 4

Board of education treasurer: accounts, bills, and receipts 1840-1847 

21 5

Board of education treasurer: accounts, bills, and receipts 1854, 1857-1867, 1869 

21 6

Board of education treasurer: accounts, bills, and receipts undated 

21 7

Board of education treasurer: cancelled checks 1821-1827 

21 8

Board of education treasurer: student tuition accounts, receipts, and notes 1815, 1832, 1839-1841 

21 9

Board of education subscription book [AmS .153] 1813-1821 

21 10

Board of education subscription book [AmS .154] 1813-1825 

21 11

Board of education treasurer: subscription lists and reports 1814-1818, 1835 

21 12
Volume

Board of education Clarkson School tuition account book 1819-1822 

AmS .188

Board of education, treasurer's subscription book of members, Clarkson School, tuition book 1835-1837 

AmS .156
Box Folder

Assorted financial material 1990 

22 1

Assorted financial material 1991 

22 2

Assorted financial material 1992 

22 3

Assorted financial material 1993 

22 4

Treasurer David J. Morrison, correspondence 1990 

22 5

Treasurer David J. Morrison, correspondence 1991 

22 6

Grants 1992 

22 7

Parish fund 1988-1991 

22 8

Return to Table of Contents »


 Series IV.  Manumissions, indentures, and other legal papers 

Series description

Series 4, Manumission, indentures, and other legal papers, contains a range of documents dating from 1785 to 1865. The majority of these materials have their origins with two committees of the Society: the Committee of Guardians, 1790-1803, recorded manumissions and indentures as they occurred under the Pennsylvania law for the gradual abolition of slavery (1780); the Committee of Inspection safeguarded the legal rights of Blacks, 1790-1803. After 1803, the Acting Committee assumed both roles. The manumission are contained in eight volumes, 1780-1853. Other records present in this series includes indentures for manumitted slaves, legal papers concerning efforts of the several committees to secure the release of Blacks brought into Pennsylvania, transcriptions of the laws regarding slavery in Pennsylvania, Virginia, New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Georgia, 1750s to 1790s.

Box Folder

Manumission document for 28 slaves in Jamaica belonging to David Barclay; in addition, a list of slaves with names and ages 1795 

2 1
Volume

"Minutes of the proceedings of the committee appointed [...] to take charge of those sent from Jamaica by David Barclay and others" 1795 

1
Box Folder

Indentures for various slaves manumitted in Jamaica by David Barclay of England 1795 

2 2

Miscellaneous manumission documents concerning slaves freed in Barbadoes, Jamaica, and Trinidad 1781, 1792, 1795, 1801, 1804 

2 3

Acting committee papers relating to slaves purchased and manumitted by M.C.Cope, Thomas Harrison, and Isaac T. Hopper 1787, 1805, 1808, 1823-1824, 1830, 1833 

2 4

Manumission and related materials: both parties to contracts being black [see microfilm guide appendix A, part 1 for item inventory] 1770, 1781-1785, 1788, 1790, 1793 

2 5

Acting committee papers relating to slaves purchased and manumitted by Thomas Harrison 1781, 1795, 1788, 1790 

2 6

Acting committee papers relating to slaves purchased and manumitted by Thomas Harrison 1791-1792, 1794, 1800-1803 

2 7

Manumission and related materials: both parties to contracts being black [see microfilm guide appendix A, part 1 for item inventory] 1796-1798, 1801, 1804-1805, 1811, 1816-1817, 1827 

2 8

Indentures and manumissions of African slaves; place of origin noted 1784-1823 

2 9

Indenture papers of Europeans (redemptioners) 1780-1798 

2 10

Indentures and manumissions of Asiatic persons 1788-1800 

2 11

Indentures and manumissions of Asiatic persons 1801-1811 

2 12

Petition of James Dunn, an East Indian boy 1790s 

2 13

Committee of Guardians indenture papers for Africans taken from the slave schooner Prudent by Capt. Maloney of the  Ganges 1800 

2 14

Committee of Guardians indenture papers for Africans taken from the slave schooner Phoebe by Capt. Maloney of the  Ganges 1800 

2 15

Committee of Guardians indenture papers for Africans taken from the slave schooner Phoebe by Capt. Maloney of the  Ganges, "C" 1800 

2 16

Committee of Guardians indenture papers for Africans taken from the slave schooner Phoebe by Capt. Maloney of the Ganges, "E"-"G" 1800 

2 17

Committee of Guardians indenture papers for Africans taken from the slave schooner Phoebe by Capt. Maloney of the  Ganges, "H"-"J" 1800 

2 18

Committee of Guardians indenture papers for Africans taken from the slave schooner Phoebe by Capt. Maloney of the  Ganges, "K"-"L" 1800 

2 19

Committee of Guardians indenture papers for Africans taken from the slave schooner Phoebe by Capt. Maloney of the  Ganges, "M"-"Mercer" 1800 

2 20

Committee of Guardians indenture papers for Africans taken from the slave schooner Phoebe by Capt. Maloney of the  Ganges, "Michener"-"N" 1800 

Folder Information

Folder found empty 04/18/2016

2 21

Committee of Guardians indenture papers for Africans taken from the slave schooner Phoebe by Capt. Maloney of the  Ganges, "O"-"R" 1800 

2 22

Committee of Guardians indenture papers for Africans taken from the slave schooner Phoebe by Capt. Maloney of the  Ganges, "S" 1800 

3A 1

Committee of Guardians indenture papers for Africans taken from the slave schooner Phoebe by Capt. Maloney of the  Ganges, "T" 1800 

3A 2

Committee of Guardians indenture papers for Africans taken from the slave schooner Phoebe by Capt. Maloney of the  Ganges, "V"-"Willcox" 1800 

3A 3

Committee of Guardians indenture papers for Africans taken from the slave schooner Phoebe by Capt. Maloney of the  Ganges, "Wilson"-"Z" 1800 

3A 4

Case of the United States vs. the slave schooner Phoebe, U.S. District Court at Philadelphia 1800 

3A 5

Philadelphia house of employment indenture papers, "A"-"C" 1782-1788 

3A 6

Philadelphia house of employment indenture papers, "D" 1782-1785 

3A 7

Philadelphia house of employment indenture papers, "E"-"G" 1783-1787 

3A 8

Philadelphia house of employment indenture papers, "H" except Harrison 1783-1784 

3A 9

Philadelphia house of employment indenture papers, "Thomas Harrison" 1788-1810 

3A 10

Philadelphia house of employment indenture papers, "I"-"L" 1784-1786 

3A 11

Philadelphia house of employment indenture papers, "M"-"N" 1783-1788 

3A 12

Philadelphia house of employment indenture papers, "O"-"R" 1784-1785 

3A 13

Philadelphia house of employment indenture papers, "S" 1783-1786 

3A 14

Philadelphia house of employment indenture papers, "T" 1784-1791 

3A 15

Philadelphia house of employment indentures, "W"-"Z" 1784-1787 

3A 16

Overseers of the poor (Philadelphia & N.J.) indentures 1757-1758, 1781, 1785, 1787, 1820 

3A 17

Indentures and releases: both parties to contracts being black 1770-1771, 1793, 1796, 1801, 1803, 1807, 1809, 1813, 1817-1818 

3A 18

Miscellaneous indentures, manumissions, and related papers 1775, 1777, 1780, 1784, 1786, 1788, 1794, 180, 1814, 1817, 1822, undated 

3A 19

Certificates of freedom, "A"-"C" 1786-1823 

3A 20

Certificates of freedom, "D"-"J" 1770-1826 

3A 21

Certificates of freedom, "K"-"P" 1780-1826 

3A 22

Certificates of freedom, "R"-"W" 1789-1824 

3A 23

Certificates of freedom 1789-1819 

3A 24

Bills of sale for slaves 1770, 1792, 1794, 1819 

3B 1

Certificates issued to prevent the impressment of blacks, and related materials 1798, 1801, 1803, 1805, 1817-1818, 1827 

3B 2

Marriage certificates for blacks 1790, 1794, 1798, 1814 

3B 3

Birth certificates of blacks 1790-1798, 1804 

3B 4

Certificates affirming the identity of blacks 1798-1799, 1809, 1815-1816, undated 

3B 5

Character references for blacks 1787, 1791-1793, 1796, 1812, 1816-1817, 1830, undated 

3B 6

Certificates allowing blacks to seek employment 1796, 1801, undated 

3B 7

Certificates concerning fugitive slaves and related material 1785, 1787, 1792, 1803, 1813, 1813, 1817 

3B 8

Passes and passports for free blacks to travel 1791-1794, 1797-1798, 1800-1801, 1803, 1805, 1807, 1817, 1820, undated 

3B 9

Papers and related documents concerning court action brought by Thomas Harrison and Issac T. Hopper against the slave schooners Eliza and  Sally 1803-1804 

3B 10

Case of Thomas Harrison and Issac T. Hopper (on behalf of the PAS Acting Committee) vs. the Tryphena 1805 

3B 11

Papers and related documents concerning court cases in which slaves were awarded freedom [see appendix A, part 3 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1773, 1780-1782, 1784-1785 

4A 1

Papers and related documents concerning court cases in which slaves were awarded freedom [see appendix A, part 3 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1791-1794 

4A 2

Papers and related documents concerning court cases in which slaves were awarded freedom [see appendix A, part 3 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1795-1800 

4A 3

Habeas corpus cases [see appendix A, part 7 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1785-1787 

4A 4

Court cases involving the illegal enslavement of freed blacks [see appendix A, part 5 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1787, 1797-1799, 1826, 1830 

4A 5

Court cases involving infringements on, or faulty indenture contracts [see appendix A, part 4 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1784-1791, 1807, 1836 

4A 6

Case of William Coachman vs. G. Hand (kidnapping of coachman by Hand), Cape May Co., New Jersey 1802-1804 

4A 7

Habeas corpus cases [see appendix A, part 3 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1789, 1790, 1792, 1795, 1801, 1810 

4A 8

Case of Dr. Williams vs. John Harrison (Williams suing on behalf of Thomas Fitzgerald, kidnapped), Edgefield District, South Carolina 1823 

4A 9

Case of Mary Frances Argine "a native of Port au Prince (a person of color)" 1825 

4A 10

Miscellaneous materials related to real and suspected slave schooners [see appendix A, part 2 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1786-1799 

4A 11

Case of Stephen Hammond vs. David McCan (kidnapping of Hannah & Fanny, slaves of Hammond) Cecil Co., Maryland 1801 

4A 12

Papers and related documents concerning court cases in which slaves were awarded freedom [see appendix A, part 3 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1801-1805, 1807, 1810, 1813, 1815 

4A 13

Case of Issac Sherman vs. the Arctic 1806 

4A 14

Case of John Humphrey vs. the brig Express: the testimony of John Hollingsworth 1799 

4A 15

Case of Issac Sherman vs. Captain Robins (and wife, Sarah) of the Sally alias  La Petite Victoire 1805 March 

4A 16

Case of Issac Sherman vs. the Good Intent 1805 

4A 17

Case of Issac Sherman vs. the Hannah 1805 

4A 18

Summaries of actions in the U.S. District Court at Philadelphia 1800, 1805 

4A 19

Case of William (mulatto) vs. William Nelson 1789-1790 

4A 20

Case of Aleck and Dick, sons of Sophia Johnson, illegally enslaved 1860-1861 

4A 21

Papers and related documents concerning court cases in which slaves were awarded freedom [see appendix A, part 3 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1816, 1818-1819, 1821-1822, 1833 

4A 22

Court cases involving fugitive slaves [see appendix A, part 6 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1786, 1797, 1819, 1822, 1834 

4A 23

Papers and related documents concerning court cases in which slaves were awarded freedom [see appendix A, part 3 of microfilm guide for item inventory] undated 

4A 24
Volume

Laws of Pennsylvania in regard to slaves 1700-1793 

AmS .7
Box Folder

Chester County, Pennsylvania: register of slaves [AmS .72] 1780 

4B 1

Materials concerning problems of individual blacks 1788, 1791-1792, 1795, 1803, 1806, 1814, 1818 

4B 2

Transcripts of laws proposed, passed, or amended regarding blacks in Virginia and Pennsylvania 1751, 1778, 1780, 1782, 1784 

4B 3

Transcripts of laws proposed, passed, or amended regarding blacks in New Jersey, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and New York 1786, 1787, 1788, 1788, 1789, 1790 

4B 4

Materials concerning problems of individual blacks (show no committee action) 1784, 1786, 1788, 1791-1793, 1796, 1803-1804, 1822, 1826 

4B 5

Materials concerning problems of individual blacks Undated 

4B 6

Transcripts of laws proposed, passed, or amended regarding blacks in New Jersey, Georgia, Maryland and other related items 1799, 1801, 1818 

4B 7

Papers related to the powers of attorney granted various persons for purpose of apprehending runaway slaves and contracting indentureships 1793-1794, 1796, 1800-1802, 1814, 1817, 1833 

4B 8

Papers related to the powers of attorney granted to Thomas Harrison, Issac T. Hopper, and Issac Barton for purposes of contracting indentures and manumissions 1799, 1802-1804, 1806-1807, 1809-1810 

4B 9

Written legal opinions by the Pennsylvania Abolition Society's counselors 1787, 1789, 1791, 1793, 1805, 1816, undated 

4B 10

Memoranda of laws in relation to slavery, in the United States Undated 

4B 11

Laws of Maryland in regard to slaves [AmS .65] 1715-1789 

4B 12

Laws of Pennsylvania for the gradual abolition of slavery 1780 

4B 13

Miscellaneous notes on individual slaves by Thomas Shipley Undated 

4B 14

Transcripts of laws proposed, passed, or amended regarding blacks in Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Virginia, and the U.S. Congress 1790, 1791, 1792, 1792, 1792, 1788, 1793 

4B 15

Transcripts of laws proposed, passed, or amended regarding blacks in the National Convention of France, British Parliament, U.S. Congress, and New Jersey 1794, 1794, 1793, 1797, 1793 

4B 16

Miscellaneous items found among the legal papers 1784, 1787, 1810, 1814, undated 

4B 17

Materials concerning problems of individual blacks 1822-1823, 1829 

4B 18

Miscellaneous cases considered by the acting committee 1784-1789, 1791-1792, 1821 

4B 19
Volume

Indenture book C 1758-1795 

AmS .06

Indenture book D 1795-1835 

AmS .061

Indenture book 1816-1831 

AmS .065

Indenture book 1817-1823 

AmS .066
Box Folder

"A" indentures: Addano-Allen 

36 1

"A" indentures: Allen-Ashmead 

36 2

"A" indentures: Aston-Avery 

36 3

"B" indentures: Bache-Baker 

36 4

"B" indentures: Benbridge-Blenon 

36 5

"B" indentures: Baldeigue-Bellevue 

36 6

"B" indentures: Boggs-Britton 

36 7

"B" indentures: Brown-Brunot 

36 8

"B" indentures: Brian-Buyyard 

36 9

"C" indentures: Caldwell-Clarke 

36 10

"C" indentures: Clarkson-Collins 

36 11

"C" indentures: Collins-Crowell 

36 12

"C" indentures: Crowell-Curiven 

36 13

"D" indentures: Dacasta-Daumas 

36 14

"D" indentures: Davidson-Denman 

36 15

"D" indentures: Derkheim-Dilworth 

36 16

"D" indentures: Dirkheim-Drummond 

36 17

"D" indentures: Dalburg-Dusenbery 

36 18

"E" indentures: Ecroyd-Elliot 

36 19

"E" indentures: Elliott-Eyre 

36 20

"F" indentures: Farris-Freshuater 

36 21

"G" indentures: Gardener-Gayyam 

General note

Filed under last name of holder.

37 1

"G" indentures: Gebler-Gibbon 

37 2

"G" indentures: Gibson-Graff 

37 3

"G" indentures: Graff-Gurney 

37 4

"H" indentures: Hahn-Harland 

37 5

"H" indentures: Harper-Hay 

37 6

"H" indentures: Hay-Hiekman 

37 7

"H" indentures: Hickman-Hopkins 

37 8

"H" indentures: Hopkins-Hymas 

37 9

"I" indentures: Immel-Inskeep 

37 10

"J" indentures: Jefferies-Jones 

37 11

"J" indentures: Jones-Julian 

37 12

"K" indentures: Keen-Kymly 

37 13

"L" indentures: Lacave-Laverce 

37 14

"L" indentures: Lavergns-Lee 

37 15

"L" indentures: Legue-Lewis 

37 16

"L" indentures: Lewis-Lohra 

37 17

"L" indentures: Longstreet-Lynch 

37 18

"M" indentures: Mainyard-Martin 

37 19

"M" indentures: Marsey-Mclaurin 

37 20

"M" indentures: Mclenchan-Meyers 

37 21

"M" indentures: Middlehouse-Miller 

37 22

"M" indentures: Milner-Morris 

37 23

"M" indentures: Morris-Murray 

37 24

"N" indentures: Nancre-Novris 

38 1

"O" indentures: O'Bayon-Osgood 

38 2

"P" indentures: Pabner-Patton 

38 3

"P" indentures: Paxson-Penson 

38 4

"P" indentures: Perrot-Pale 

38 5

"P" indentures: Porter-Potts 

38 6

"P" indentures: Poulson-Pryor 

38 7

"R" indentures: Randolph-Rex 

38 8

"R" indentures: Rex-Roberts 

38 9

"R" indentures: Robertson-Roland 

38 10

"R" indentures: Roney-Rutter 

38 11

"S" indentures: Sadler-Shaw 

38 12

"S" indentures: Show-Shouse 

38 13

"S" indentures: Shull-Skillinger 

38 14

"S" indentures: Skyren-Snyder 

38 15

"S" indentures: Soret-Stolhort 

38 16

"S" indentures: Stout-Stroud 

38 17

"S" indentures: Stroude-Sybert 

38 18

"S" indentures: Talbot-Taylor 

38 19

"T" indentures: Taylor-Thornson 

38 20

"T" indentures: Thursday-Towers 

38 21

"T" indentures: Trusty-Tysoa 

38 22

"U" indentures: Ustick-Unang 

38 23

"V" indentures: Vanberkel-Voyar 

38 24

"W" indentures: Walker-Waterman 

38 25

"W" indentures: Waters-West 

38 26

"W" indentures: Wester-Wilcox 

38 27

"W" indentures: Wilkenson-Wilvanson 

38 28

"W" indentures: Wilson-Wrigley 

38 29

"Y" indentures: Young-Yrujo 

38 30

"Z" indentures: Zane-Zantzinger 

38 31
Volume

Manumission book A 1780-1793 

AmS .05

Manumission book B 1788-1795 

AmS .051

Manumission book C 1795 

AmS .052

Index of manumission books A, B, and C 

AmS .053

Manumission book D, part 1 1795-1801 

AmS .054

Manumission book D, part 2 1795-1801 

AmS .054

Index of manumission book D 1795-1801 

AmS .055

Manumission book E/Acting Committee Minutes, 1789-1790 1792-1806, 1789-1790 

AmS .056

Manumission book F 1790-1819 

AmS .057

Manumission book G 1819-1853 

AmS .058
Box Folder

"A" manumissions: Abercrombie-Alexander 

39 1

"A" manumissions: Allain-Andre 

39 2

"A" manumissions: Andrews-Armande 

39 3

"A" manumissions: Armroyd-Austin 

39 4

"A" manumissions: Autrusseau-Ayres 

39 5

"B" manumissions: Bacgue-Banning 

39 6

"B" manumissions: slaves freed by J.B.R Barbarin 1795 

39 7

"B" manumissions: slaves freed by J.B.R Barbarin 1794-1795 

39 8

"B" manumissions: Barclay-Baritaux 

39 9

"B" manumissions: Banker-Barnes 

39 10

"B" manumissions: Barnhill-Bartram 

39 11

"B" manumissions: Bassett-Bazell 

39 12

"B" manumissions: Beach-Bedford 

39 13

"B" manumissions: Bebe-Belk 

39 14

"B" manumissions: Bell-Bellocle 

39 15

"B" manumissions: Belzons-Benson 

39 16

"B" manumissions: Beon-Berton 

39 17

"B" manumissions: Bertrand-Bevan 

39 18

"B" manumissions: Bickley-Blackwell 

40 1

"B" manumissions: Blakeston-Block 

40 2

"B" manumissions: Bocage-Boles 

40 3

"B" manumissions: Bolland-Booth 

40 4

"B" manumissions: Bordaux-Boulineau 

40 5

"B" manumissions: Boullay 

40 6

"B" manumissions: Boureaux-Bowie 

40 7

"B" manumissions: Bowman-Boyer 

40 8

"B" manumissions: Brumeau-Brunet 

40 9

"B" manumissions: Bryan 

40 10

"B" manumissions: Bradford-Brady 

40 11

"B" manumissions: Brandon-Breard 

40 12

"B" manumissions: Brickley 

40 13

"B" manumissions: Brinckle-Bringhurst 

40 14

"B" manumissions: Brinkley-Broughton 

41 15

"B" manumissions: Brown 

40 16

"B" manumissions: Browne-Browning 

40 17

"B" manumissions: Buck 

40 18

"B" manumissions: Bucklaw-Burk 

40 19

"B" manumissions: Burland-Burrows 

40 20

"B" manumissions: Burton-Butler 

40 21

"C" manumissions: Cadie-Caldwell 

41 1

"C" manumissions: Canivet-Cappe 

41 2

"C" manumissions: Car-Carey 

41 3

"C" manumissions: Carey 

41 4

"C" manumissions: Cariau-Carlisle 

41 5

"C" manumissions: Carnan-Carre 

41 6

"C" manumissions: Carroll-Castro 

41 7

"C" manumissions: Catineau 

41 8

"C" manumissions: Caverly-Ceronio 

41 9

"C" manumissions: Chadwick-Chamayou 

41 10

"C" manumissions: Chambeslain 

41 11

"C" manumissions: Chanceaulme-Chassagne 

41 12

"C" manumissions: Chasten-Chauveau 

41 13

"C" manumissions: Chauvet-Chavan 

41 14

"C" manumissions: Cheeseman-Church 

41 15

"C" manumissions: Cireithon-Clarens 

41 16

"C" manumissions: Clark 

41 17

"C" manumissions: Clarke 

41 18

"C" manumissions: Clarkson 

41 19

"C" manumissions: Clay-Clymin 

41 20

"C" manumissions: Coale-Collins 

42 1

"C" manumissions: Collins 

42 2

"C" manumissions: Comegys-Conyingham 

42 3

"C" manumissions: Cook-Coombe 

42 4

"C" manumissions: Cooper-Corysiguy 

42 4

"C" manumissions: Collineau 

42 5

"C" manumissions: Cottingham-Coupigny 

42 6

"C" manumissions: Couret-Courtade 

42 7

"C" manumissions: Courtois-Coxe 

42 8

"C" manumissions: Cozens-Crockett 

42 9

"C" manumissions: Crosby-Cummings 

42 10

"C" manumissions: Cummings-Custis 

42 11

"C" manumissions: Dabaddie-Danicourt 

42 12

"D" manumissions: Daniel 

42 13

"D" manumissions: D'arce-D'artis 

42 14

"D" manumissions: Dauffriedy-Davis 

42 15

"D" manumissions: Davis-Dawson 

42 16

"D" manumissions: Day-Dazey 

42 17

"D" manumissions: Deall-Defrenay 

42 18

"D" manumissions: Degalaup-Dekercado 

43 1

"D" manumissions: Delahay-De Maris 

43 2

"D" manumissions: De Montulles-Dent 

43 3

"D" manumissions: De Petray-De Pont 

43 4

"D" manumissions: Derickson-De Saxy 

43 5

"D" manumissions: Des Bordes-De Sermaize 

43 6

"D" manumissions: De Sessard-Deshais 

43 7

"D" manumissions: De Sibert-Dexter 

43 8

"D" manumissions: D'hanache-Dick 

43 9

"D" manumissions: Dickinson 

43 10

"D" manumissions: Dieterick-Dill 

43 11

"D" manumissions: Dirickson 

43 12

"D" manumissions: Disharoon-Dorfeuille 

43 13

"D" manumissions: Dorman 

43 14

"D" manumissions: Dorsey-DoTine 

43 15

"D" manumissions: Douglass-Doz 

43 16

"D" manumissions: Draper 

43 17

"D" manumissions: Draper-Drymock 

43 18

"D" manumissions: Dubourg-Ducolombier 

43 19

"D" manumissions: Ducoudrai-Dufourg 

43 20

"D" manumissions: Dugay-Duhamel 

43 21

"D" manumissions: Dulongvas 

43 22

"D" manumissions: Dumon-Dunwoody 

43 23

"D" manumissions: Dupre-Duplessis 

43 24

"D" manumissions: Dupon-Dupuy 

43 25

"D" manumissions: Duranton-Dutilk 

43 26

"D" manumissions: Dutour-Duval 

43 27

"D" manumissions: Duvivier-Dye 

43 28

"E" manumissions: Eakin-Egron 

44 1

"E" manumissions: Ellington-Elliot 

44 2

"E" manumissions: Emmerson-Etting 

44 3

"E" manumissions: Evans-Ewell 

44 4

"F" manumissions: Farress-Fedderman 

44 5

"F" manumissions: Ferras-Few 

44 6

"F" manumissions: Felton-Ferrall 

44 7

"F" manumissions: Field-Fissour 

44 8

"F" manumissions: Fitzsimmons-Floyd 

44 9

"F" manumissions: Foure-Franklin 

44 10

"F" manumissions: Foard-Forde 

44 11

"F" manumissions: Forman-Fourcroy 

44 12

"F" manumissions: Fraser-Frazier 

44 13

"F" manumissions: Freeman-Froner 

44 14

"F" manumissions: Frontis-Furches 

44 15

"F" manumissions: Furman-Futcher 

44 16

"G" manumissions:Gale-Gallion 

44 17

"G" manumissions: Gamble-Garretson 

44 18

"G" manumissions: Gaurd-Geddes 

44 19

"G" manumissions: Gather-Gatliff 

44 20

"G" manumissions: Genti-Getin 

44 21

"G" manumissions: Gibbs 

45 1

"G" manumissions: Gibson 

45 2

"G" manumissions: Gibson-Giese 

45 3

"G" manumissions: Gilder-Gillan 

45 4

"G" manumissions: Gillappy-Girard 

45 5

"G" manumissions: Girard 

45 6

"G" manumissions: Goble-Goldsborrow 

45 7

"G" manumissions: Gooding-Gover 

45 8

"G" manumissions: Graff-Grandpre 

45 9

"G" manumissions: Granier-Gray 

45 10

"G" manumissions: Green-Greffin 

45 11

"G" manumissions: Greland-Groff 

45 12

"G" manumissions: Guerin-Gurrun 

45 13

"H" manumissions: Habacker-Haley 

45 14

"H" manumissions: Hall 

45 15

"H" manumissions: Ham-Hardnett 

45 16

"H" manumissions: Harris-Harrison 

45 17

"H" manumissions: Harvey-Hays 

45 18

"H" manumissions: Hayward-Hazzard 

45 19

"H" manumissions: Hazzard 

45 20

"H" manumissions: Heath-Hendricks 

46 1

"H" manumissions: Henderickson-Hesselius 

46 2

"H" manumissions: Heynes-Higgins 

45 3

"H" manumissions: Hill-Hivee 

45 4

"H" manumissions: Hobart-Hodson 

46 5

"H" manumissions: Hoff-Holmes 

46 6

"H" manumissions: Homasset-Hourquebie 

46 7

"H" manumissions: Houston-Howard 

46 8

"H" manumissions: Howell-Huger 

46 9

"H" manumissions: Hughes-Humphreys 

46 10

"H" manumissions: Hunn-Hynson 

46 11

"I" manumissions: Imbertt-Iredell 

46 12

"I" manumissions: Ireland 

46 13

"I" manumissions: Irons-Izard 

46 14

"J" manumissions: Jacks-Jacobs 

46 15

"J" manumissions: James-Jaymond 

46 16

"J" manumissions: Jeanton-Johnson 

46 17

"J" manumissions: Johnson 

46 18

"J" manumissions: Johnston-Jones 

46 19

"J" manumissions: Joseph-Joyeuse 

46 20

"K" manumissions: Kauffman-Kelly 

47 1

"K" manumissions: Kelsal-Kerlin 

47 2

"K" manumissions: Kern-Killen 

47 3

"K" manumissions: King 

47 4

"K" manumissions: King-Kingsmore 

47 5

"K" manumissions: Kirk-Knight 

47 6

"K" manumissions: Knowles-Kuntz 

47 7

"L" manumissions: La Bartha-La Chaise 

47 8

"L" manumissions: Lachicotte 

47 9

"L" manumissions: Lachicotte 

47 10

"L" manumissions: La Coudre 

47 11

"L" manumissions: Ladd-La Forrest 

47 12

"L" manumissions: La Garde-Lagnel 

47 13

"L" manumissions: Lamarque-Lambert 

47 14

"L" manumissions: Lameau-Lank 

47 15

"L" manumissions: La Peyre-La Porte 

47 16

"L" manumissions: Larne-LaSalle 

47 17

"L" manumissions: Lasneau-Laurent 

47 18

"L" manumissions:Lavaud 

47 19

"L" manumissions: Lavergne-Lay 

47 20

"L" manumissions: Leamey-Le Cesme 

48 1

"L" manumissions: Le Compte-Lee 

48 2

"L" manumissions: Le Faivre-Leonard 

48 3

"L" manumissions: Le Roy 

48 4

"L" manumissions: Les Bazeilles-Le Tailleur 

48 5

"L" manumissions: Lettellier-Lewis 

48 6

"L" manumissions: L'Homme-Lisle 

48 7

"L" manumissions: Little 

48 8

"L" manumissions: Littler-Lloyd 

48 9

"L" manumissions: Lock-Logan 

48 10

"L" manumissions: Loiselle-Lorain 

48 11

"L" manumissions: Louis-Lowbee 

48 12

"L" manumissions: Lowry-Ludwick 

48 13

"L" manumissions: Luff-Lynch 

48 14

"M" manumissions: McCall 

48 15

"M" manumissions: McCall 

48 16

"M" manumissions: McCallmont-McComb 

48 17

"M" manumissions: McCormick-McHenry 

48 18

"M" manumissions: McIllhenny-McWilliam 

48 19

"M" manumissions: Mahe-Malerive 

48 20

"M" manumissions: Mack-Mahau 

48 21

"M" manumissions: Maisoneuve-Maneq 

48 22

"M" manumissions: Manguin-Mansaige 

48 23

"M" manumissions: Marcadier-Mark 

49 1

"M" manumissions: Markoe-Marsh 

49 2

"M" manumissions: Marshall-Marye 

49 3

"M" manumissions: Maskell-Massey 

49 4

"M" manumissions: Massey-Mathieu 

49 5

"M" manumissions: Matsinger-Mayer 

49 6

"M" manumissions: Meade-Meeks 

49 7

"M" manumissions: Mehin-Merine 

49 8

"M" manumissions: Messer-Meya 

49 9

"M" manumissions: Michael-Micolin 

49 10

"M" manumissions: Mifflin-Milburn 

49 11

"M" manumissions: Milby 

49 12

"M" manumissions: Milby 

49 13

"M" manumissions: Milby 

49 14

"M" manumissions: Milhau-Milles 

49 15

"M" manumissions: Milligan 

49 16

"M" manumissions: Mills-Milne 

49 17

"M" manumissions: Miners'-Mitchell 

49 18

"M" manumissions: Molart-Mondion 

49 19

"M" manumissions: Monges-Montulle 

49 20

"M" manumissions: Moor-Moore 

50 1

"M" manumissions: Moore-Morel 

50 2

"M" manumissions: Moret-Morgan 

50 3

"M" manumissions: Morison-Morphy 

50 4

"M" manumissions: Morris 

50 5

"M" manumissions: Morris 

50 6

"M" manumissions: Morris-Mory 

40 7

"M" manumissions: Mott-Moulia 

50 8

"M" manumissions: Mourier-Munro 

50 9

"M" manumissions: Murray-Myers 

50 10

"N" manumissions: Nameir-Nassy 

50 11

"N" manumissions: Naudain-Neaudet 

50 12

"N" manumissions: Needles-Neufchatel 

50 13

"N" manumissions: Neville-Nichols 

50 14

"N" manumissions: Nicholson-Nixon 

50 15

"N" manumissions: Noailles 

50 16

Manumission intention by Trustees of North (Arolins Yearly Meeting of Friends) 1812 

50 17

"N" manumissions: Noel-Nourse 

50 18

"O" manumissions: O'Bryan 

50 19

"O" manumissions: Osborn-Osman 

50 20

"O" manumissions: O'Connor-Orr 

50 21

"O" manumissions: Otto-Owings 

50 22

"P" manumissions: Page-Paradee 

51 1

"P" manumissions: Parr-Patton 

51 2

"P" manumissions: Payan 

51 3

"P" manumissions: Paynter 

51 4

"P" manumissions: Paynter 

51 5

"P" manumissions: Peake-Peirce 

51 6

"P" manumissions: Pemberton-Pennington 

51 7

"P" manumissions: Pereyre-Pescay 

51 8

"P" manumissions: Peterson-Petite 

51 9

"P" manumissions: Pettit-Picot 

51 10

"P" manumissions: Piercy-Pitray 

51 11

"P" manumissions: Plantrion-Pleasanton 

51 12

"P" manumissions: Polk-Pope 

51 13

"P" manumissions: Porier-Poulson 

51 14

"P" manumissions: Pork-Porkinson 

51 15

"P" manumissions: Pourcent 

51 16

"P" manumissions: Pourcent 

51 17

"P" manumissions: Powell-Premord 

51 18

"P" manumissions: Prentiss-Prescal 

51 19

"P" manumissions: Primrose-Prudhomme 

51 20

"P" manumissions: Pryor-Purdon 

51 21

"P" manumissions: Purdue-Purnell 

51 22

"Q" manumissions: last names beginning with "Q" 

52 1

"R" manumissions: Rabateau-Raffit 

52 2

"R" manumissions: Raguett-Rape 

52 3

"R" manumissions: Ratiliff-Reading 

52 4

"R" manumissions: Redman-Reed 

52 5

"R" manumissions: Rees-Remonstin 

52 6

"R" manumissions: Remsen-Renault 

52 7

"R" manumissions: Renette-Reynolds 

52 8

"R" manumissions: Rex-Richards 

52 9

"R" manumissions: Richardson-Rickards 

52 10

"R" manumissions: Ricketts-Ridgely 

52 11

"R" manumissions: Rigail-Ripert 

52 12

"R" manumissions: Robbins-Robertson 

52 13

"R" manumissions: Robinson 

52 14

"R" manumissions: Rodney 

52 15

"R" manumissions: Rodney 

52 16

"R" manumissions: Rodney-Rogers 

52 17

"R" manumissions: Rolph-Ross 

52 18

"R" manumissions: Rostain-Rouge 

52 19

"R" manumissions: Rousseau-Royster 

52 20

"R" manumissions: Ruff-Rumsy 

52 21

"R" manumissions: Ruotte-Russel 

52 22

"R" manumissions: Russum-Ryerson 

52 23

"S" manumissions: Sacqui-Saint Leon 

53 1

"S" manumissions: Saint Martin-Saint Philippe 

53 2

"S" manumissions: Sainton-Salinberri 

53 3

"S" manumissions: Sallenave-Salles 

53 4

"S" manumissions: Sandham-Savoy 

53 5

"S" manumissions: Sayre-Scuddee 

53 6

"S" manumissions: Sears-Sebring 

53 7

"S" manumissions: Seeley-Selby 

53 8

"S" manumissions: Senechal-Seth 

53 9

"S" manumissions: Sewell-Shannon 

53 10

"S" manumissions: Sharpless-Shields 

53 11

"S" manumissions: Shorkley-Shute 

53 12

"S" manumissions: Sibbald-Silvain 

53 13

"S" manumissions: Similier-Simons 

53 14

"S" manumissions: Simpler-Singleton 

53 15

"S" manumissions: Sipple-Slubey 

53 16

"S" manumissions: Slyear-Smith 

53 17

"S" manumissions: Smith 

53 18

"S" manumissions: Smith 

53 19

"S" manumissions: Smith 

53 20

"S" manumissions: Smyth-Snowden 

54 1

"S" manumissions: Somerville-Sourzan 

54 2

"S" manumissions: Sparks-Spencer 

54 3

"S" manumissions: Sprigg-Steele 

54 4

"S" manumissions: Steele 

54 5

"S" manumissions: Staughton-Stevens 

54 6

"S" manumissions: Stevenson-Stewart 

54 7

"S" manumissions: Stewart 

54 8

"S" manumissions: Stil-Stodert 

54 9

"S" manumissions: Stokes-Stott 

54 10

"S" manumissions: Stollenwerck-Stuart 

54 11

"S" manumissions: Stuart-Stutson 

54 12

"S" manumissions: Styer-Sutton 

54 13

"S" manumissions: Swallow-Symons 

54 14

"T" manumissions: Tagart-Taylor 

54 15

"T" manumissions: Teakle-Teale 

54 16

"T" manumissions: Temlin-Tete 

54 17

"T" manumissions: Tharp-Thiot 

54 18

"T" manumissions: Thomas 

54 19

"T" manumissions: Thompson 

54 20

"T" manumissions: Thompson-Thunis 

54 21

"T" manumissions: Tilghman-Tingley 

54 22

"T" manumissions: Tod-Touchmoulin 

54 23

"T" manumissions: Tousard-Tracey 

54 24

"T" manumissions: Tracy-Travis 

55 1

"T" manumissions: Treuil-Trigaud 

55 2

"T" manumissions: Tripp-Trueblood 

55 3

"T" manumissions: Truitt-Turman 

55 4

"T" manumissions: Turner-Tyler 

55 5

"U" manumissions: owners' names beginning with "U" 

55 6

"V" manumissions: Vaisse-Vallentine 

55 7

"V" manumissions: Vallette-Vanderslice 

55 8

"V" manumissions: Vanderveeke-Vanderveer 

55 9

"V" manumissions: Vandike-Van Horn 

55 10

"V" manumissions: Van Marten-Vardon 

55 11

"V" manumissions: Vence-Veyrier 

55 12

"V" manumissions: Vicay-Vigne 

55 13

"V" manumissions: Vignier-Virdon 

55 14

"V" manumissions: Vivien-Volant 

55 15

"W" manumissions: Wade-Wall 

55 16

"W" manumissions: Wallace-Waples 

55 17

"W" manumissions: Ward-Warner 

55 18

"W" manumissions: Warrington-Watts 

55 19

"W" manumissions: Weaver-Welsh 

55 20

"W" manumissions: West 

55 21

"W" manumissions: West 

55 22

"W" manumissions: West 

56 1

"W" manumissions: West 

56 2

"W" manumissions: West 

56 3

"W" manumissions: West 

56 4

"W" manumissions: West 

56 5

"W" manumissions: Westerly-Wharton 

56 6

"W" manumissions: Wheelan-White 

56 7

"W" manumissions: White 

56 8

"W" manumissions: White 

56 9

"W" manumissions: Whiteside-Whittington 

56 10

"W" manumissions: Wickoff-Wilcocks 

56 11

"W" manumissions: Williams-Williamson 

56 12

"W" manumissions: Wilson-Whitberger 

56 13

"W" manumissions: Wilkinson-Williams 

56 14

"W" manumissions: Williamson-Wilmer 

56 15

"W" manumissions: Wilmore-Wilson 

56 16

"W" manumissions: Winslow-Wistar 

56 17

"W" manumissions: Wood-Woodman 

56 18

"W" manumissions: Wolf-Wood 

56 19

"W" manumissions: Workman-Wright 

56 20

"Y" manumissions: Y 

56 21

"Z" manumissions: Z 

56 22

Return to Table of Contents »


 Series V.  Miscellaneous papers 1784-1987 

Series description

Series 5, Miscellaneous papers, contains the following: lists of officers and members, 1784-1819; memorials to both houses of Congress and several state legislatures regarding slavery, 1788-1860; records of related institutions, including: Lombard Street Infant School, roll book, 1849-1850; Clarkson Institute, Constitution, 1832, minutes, accounts, and reports, 1829-1837; Committee to Visit Colored People, Census Facts collected by Benjamin Bacon and Charles Gardner, 1838; Facts on Beneficial Societies, 1823-1838. Present, too, are extensive materials on the American Convention, which met irregularly in Philadelphia, 1794-1836, arranged by year: minutes, credentials, lists of members, committee reports, treasurer's accounts.

Also present in this series are the papers of organizations to which Abolition Society members belonged: Philadelphia Anti-Slavery Society, minutes, 1833-1870, incoming correspondence 1834-1853; Young Men's Anti-Slavery Society, committee reports, 1836-1837, incoming correspondence, 1834-1837, treasurer's accounts, 1835-1838; South Mulberry Ward (Philadelphia) Anti-Slavery Society, minutes, 1837; Junior Anti-Slavery Society of Philadelphia, constitution and minutes, 1836-1846; Bache Institute, accounts, 1851-1852; Philadelphia Yearly Meeting, Committee on Requited Labor, minutes and correspondence, 1837-1839; American Free Produce Association, correspondence and circulars, 1838-1840; Philadelphia Anti-Slavery Society, constitution, 1839; Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society, minutes, 1838-1846, executive committee minutes, 1846-1870, accounts, 1847-1849, Vigilance Committee of Philadelphia, accounts, 1854-1857, "Journal C of Station No. 2 of the Underground Railroad," William Still, agent, 1852-1857; 13th Ward Republican Club of Philadelphia, constitution and minutes, 1856-1859.

Box Folder

Various lists of officers and committeemen of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society 1802, 1807, 1814-1815, 1818 

5A 1
Volume

List of members 1784-1819 

AmS .03
Box Folder

Lists of persons proposed for PAS membership 1788, 1826, undated  

5A 2
Oversize

"Officers etc. 1775-1860 of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery [...]" circa 1860 

Flat file 4

"Various committees of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery from 1784-1860" circa 1860 

Flat file 5
Box Folder

Miscellaneous listings of members undated 

5A 3

Report of the election of PAS delegates to the American Convention of 1794, and undated ballots 1794, undated 

5A 4

PAS membership certificates 1817-1843 

5A 5

PAS membership certificates 1803-1843 

5A 6

PAS membership certificates 1801-1833 

5A 7

Blank membership certificates undated 

5A 8

Memorial of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery to the Senate and Representatives of the United States 1790 December 12 

5B 1

Address of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society in behalf of the colored people 1821 

5B 2
Oversize

"List of 316 French Slaves ransomed at Algiers in 1785 [...]" broadside circa 1785 

Flat file 1
Box Folder

Broadsides and other printed material (1 of 4) [see appendix B, part 1 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1788-1790 

5B 3
Oversize

"Remarks on the Slave Trade" with a "Plan of an African ship's lower deck with Negroes [...]" 1789 May 29 

Flat file 2
Box Folder

Edwin Atlee address to the citizens of Philadelphia 1834 

5B 4

Broadsides and other printed material (2 of 4) [see appendix B, part 1 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1791-1798 

5B 5

Broadsides and other printed material (3 of 4) [see appendix B, part 1 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1812, 1816, 1818, 1831, 1856, 1863, 1866 

5B 6

"Address of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and other benefits of the African race, to the free people of colour" 1820 

5B 7

"To the honorable the House of Representatives of the United States, the grand inquest of the nation" petition for the impeachment of Andrew Johnson 1866 

5B 8

"Address from a committee appointed to solicit annual subscriptions and donations, in aid of the school fund of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society" 1821 

5B 9

"Thoughts on best plan for anti-slavery men to pursue" address by unknown author undated 

5B 10

Draft of an address to the various abolition societies from the American Convention 1794 

5B 11

Address of the American Convention to the Pennsylvania Abolition Society 1812 

5B 12

"To the friends of religion and the lovers of liberty and mankind" from the PAS 1787 

5B 13

"In commemoration of the freedom of slaves in the British colonies" address by Adwin Atlee undated 

5B 14

"Thoughts on slavery and the domestic slave trade" address by Edwin Atlee circa 1821 

5B 15

"To the honourable the Convention of the United States now assembled in the city of Philadelphia, the memorial of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the [...]" 1787 June 2 

5B 16

"To the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, in general assembly met: the memorial of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the[...]" 1788 

5B 17

"To the representatives of the freemen of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in general assembly met, the representation and petition of the subscribers citizens of Pennsylvania" 1788 

5B 18

"To the general assembly of New Jersey, the address, memorial, and petition of the religious society called Quakers" 1788 

5B 19

"Extract from the minutes of the House of Representatives on the memorials relating to the African slave trade" 1790 

5B 20

"To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in congress assembled, memorial and petition of the delegates from the several societies formed in different parts of the U.S for promoting the abolition of slavery" 1791 

5B 21

"The memorial of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of slavery and for [...], to Congress" circa 1858 

5B 22

"To the Senate and the House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the remonstrance of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting [...]" 1825 

5B 23

Broadsides and other printed material (4 of 4) [see appendix B, part 1 of microfilm guide for item inventory] undated 

5B 24

"To the honourable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the memorial of the Pennsylvania Society for promoting the abolition of slavery[...]" undated 

5B 25

"Such introductory remarks as the circumstances of the time seem to render proper" address by unknown author undated 

5B 26

"To the Senate and the House of Representatives for the United States of America, the Address of the Representatives of the religious society called Quakers in the state of New York, and western parts of New England" 1790 February 10 

5B 27

"To the House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the memorial of the acting and corresponding committees of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society" 1790 

5B 28

"The Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, the memorial and remonstrance of the subscribers, citizens of the United States, residing in Boston, Massachusetts" circa 1810s 

5B 29

"To the American Convention for promoting the abolition of slavery, to be assembled in Philadelphia on the 10th of December 1818" 1818 December 10 

5B 30

"Memorial to the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, from the PAS" circa 1820s 

5B 31

"Memorial to his excellency Joseph Hiester, Governor of the state of Pennsylvania" from the PAS circa 1820-1823 

5B 32

"To the Senate and House of Representatives of the state of Pennsylvania" from the PAS circa 1850s 

5B 33

"What are the respective merits of the anti-slavery and colonization societies" address by Edwin Atlee 1832 

5B 34

"Memorial to the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America" from the PAS 1860 May 28 

5B 35

Lists of boys in the black school under the care of the committee of education of the Abolition Society 1790-1800 

5B 36

"Memorial to the Senate and the House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania" from the PAS 1813 

5B 37

Various drafts of speeches and addresses by Edwin Atlee undated 

5B 38

"At a meeting of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery and Improving the Condition of the African Race, held on the 13th day of April, 1820, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted" 1820 April 13 

5B 39

Lists of girls in the black school under the care of the committee of education of the Abolition Society 1790-1800 

5B 40

Board of education lists of various schools, teachers and pupils 1835, 1839-1840, undated 

5B 41
Volume

Board of education: Lombard Street Infant School roll book 1849-1850 

AmS .172

Board of education: Lombard Street Infant School roll book 1843-1850 

AmS .173

Board of education: Clarkson School roll book for girls 1820-1823 

AmS .181

Board of education: Clarkson School entrance book for girls school 1828-1838 

AmS .183

Board of education: Clarkson School roll book 1831-1838 

AmS .184

Board of education: Clarkson School roll book 1834-1835 

AmS .335

Board of education: Clarkson School roll book 1836-1837 

AmS .57
Box Folder

Board of education: writing samples of black pupils 1792-1795 

6 1

Board of education: writing samples of black pupils 1795-1798 

6 2

Board of education: writing samples of black pupils undated 

6 3

Board of education: contract and agreement of teachers with the board 1814, 1818 

6 4

Board of education: miscellaneous reports and notes 1803, 1834, 1838, 1858, undated 

6 5
Volume

Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania minute book 1829-1833 

AmS .331
Box Folder

Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania board of managers minutes and reports to the general meeting 1830, 1834-1838 

6 6
Volume

Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania minute book 1830-1836 

AmS .3312

Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania treasurer's accounts 1830-1838 

AmS .338
Box Folder

Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania constitutions [AmS .33] 1832 

6 7

Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania membership lists 1834-1835 

6 8

Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania correspondence, incoming 1834-1838 

6 9

Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania financial records, accounts and reports 1834-1838 

6 10
Volume

Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania minute book 1834-1838 

AmS .3311
Box Folder

Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania general meeting reports 1835-1839 

6 11
Volume

Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania board of manager minute book 1836-1838 

AmS .3313
Box Folder

Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania correspondence, outgoing 1837 

6 12

Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania report of the committee on the history of the association 1837 

6 13

Board of Education Clarkson School "list of pupils whose quarters on account on or before the 1st of 4th month 1839, not paid at this time" 1839 

6 14

Clarkson Evening School Association roll, Clarkson Evening School Association roll book [AmS .332] 1857-1858, 1858 

6 15

Clarkson Evening School Association reports from Aurelia M. West, principal 1859-1860 

6 16

Clarkson Evening School Association treasurer accounts 1860 

6 17

Clarkson Educational Association minutes [AmS .334] 1861-1862 

6 18

Clarkson Educational Association treasurer accounts and a bill 1861-1862, 1862 

6 19

Clarkson Educational Association correspondence, incoming 1861-1862, undated 

6 20

Clarkson Educational Association reports from teachers and committees 1861, 1862, undated 

6 21

Drafts/drawings of Clarkson Hall undated 

6 22
Volume

"Committee to visit the Colored People" census facts collected by Benjamin C. Bacon and Charles Gardner [4 volumes] 1838 

AmS .133
Box Folder

"Committee to visit the Colored People" analysis of census facts collected by Benjamin C. Bacon and Charles Gardner [AmS .134] 1838 

6 23
Volume

Facts on beneficial societies 1823-1838 

AmS .135

"Facts on beneficial societies and schools for negroes" 1838 

AmS .136
Box Folder

Statistics on black crime in Philadelphia, compiled by Wm. Mullen, prison agent (1835-1858) 1859 

6 24
Volume

Board of education: Education and employment statistics of the colored people of Philadelphia [2 volumes] 1856 

AmS .16

Committee on employment: Freedmen's Employment Agency books 1862-1865 

AmS .138
Box Folder

Committee on employment: Freedmen's Employment Agency notations on freedmen placed in jobs, their employers, and incurred expenses 1862-1864 

7 1

Committee on employment: Freedmen's Employment Agency circular and receipt 1865 

7 2
Volume

Committee on employment: Freedmen's Employment Agency register 1867 

AmS .57
Box Folder

Contract between the PAS and John Oliver for a room in Clarkson Hall to be used as an employment office for colored persons of both sexes 1863 

7 3

Resolution pertaining to the free transportation of freedom to Philadelphia, and the establishment of a "home-preserve" undated 

7 4

Subscription book for a directory of black mechanics residing in Philadelphia and the Liberties 1839 

7 5

Miscellaneous papers [see appendix B, part 2 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1767-1768, 1774, 1776, 1779, 1784, 1787-1792, 1794, 1800-1804, 1808, 1818, 1823, 1825, 1854 

7 6

Assorted materials [see appendix B, part 3 of microfilm guide for item inventory] undated 

7 7
Volume

American Convention for promoting...the Condition of the African Race minute book 1794-1804 

AmS .2

American Convention for promoting...the Condition of the African Race acting committee minute book 1804-1827 

AmS .205

American Convention for promoting...the Condition of the African Race minute book 1805-1809 

AmS .201

American Convention for promoting...the Condition of the African Race acting committee minute book 1827-1837 

AmS .206
Box Folder

American Convention of 1794: Minutes and committee reports 1794 January 1-7 

8A 1

American Convention of 1795: Minutes and committee reports 1795 January 7-14 

8A 2

American Convention of 1794: Credentials of delegates 1794 

8A 3

American Convention of 1795: Roll list of delegates to convention 1795 

8A 4

American Convention of 1795: "History of the New York Manumission Society" 1794 

8A 5

American Convention of 1795: "List of the officers of the manumission society of New York" 1795 November 

8A 6

American Convention of 1795: Credentials of delegates 1795 

8A 7

American Convention of 1796: Minutes and committee reports 1796 January 1-7 

8A 8

American Convention of 1796: Roll list of delegates to convention 1796 

8A 9

American Convention of 1796: Reports of the Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, and Virginia abolition societies to the convention 1796 January 

8A 10

American Convention of 1796: "Acts of the General Assembly of Virginia concerning slaves, free negroes, and mulattos---passed in the years 1795 and 1796---" 1796 

8A 11

American Convention of 1796: "Extract from the New York Manumission Society's constitution relating to education" 1796 

8A 12

American Convention of 1796: "Copy of a petition from the 'Alexandria Society for the relief and protection of persons illegally held in bondage' to the General Assemby of Virginia" 1795 

8A 13

American Convention of 1796: Credentials of delegates 1796 

8A 14

American Convention of 1797: Minutes and committee reports 1797 May 3-9 

8A 15

American Convention of 1797: Roll list of delegates to convention 1797 

8A 16

American Convention of 1797: "Report from the Maryland Society for promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and etc." 1797 

8A 17
Volume

American Convention of 1797: "Report from the New York Society promoting the manumission of slave & etc., made to the convention of delegates from the abolition societies to be held at Philadelphia, the third of May 1797" 1797 

AmS .228
Box Folder

American Convention of 1797: "Report from the Virginia Abolition Society, with a list of officers and members" 1797 

8A 18

American Convention of 1797: "A table showing the recommendations and requisitions of the convention of 1796 and of former conventions, and how far they have hitherto been complied with by each society" 1797 

8A 19

American Convention of 1797: "Opinion of William Rawle on the fourth section of the report of the committee of arrangement" 1797 

8A 20

American Convention of 1797: Credentials of delegates 1797 

8A 21

American Convention of 1798: Minutes and committee reports 1798 June 1-6 

8A 22

American Convention of 1798: "Reports of the New Jersey Abolition Society" 1798 June 

8A 23

American Convention of 1798: "Report of the Providence Abolition Society of the 'requisitions of the Convention of 1797'" 1798 May 21 

8A 24

American Convention of 1798: "Extract from the report of the New York Manumission Society respecting schools" 1798 

8A 25

American Convention of 1798: "Extracts and notes of the laws regarding slaves and fee blacks in Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia" circa 1798 

8A 26

American Convention of 1798: Credentials of delegates 1798 

8A 27

American Convention of 1800: Minutes and committee reports 1800 June 4-6 

8A 28

American Convention of 1800: Report of the New York Manumission Society to the Convention 1800 May 20 

8A 29

American Convention of 1800: "List of the residences of congressmen" 1800 

8A 30

American Convention of 1800: Certificates of baptism for two mulatto children in the parish of St. Nicholas, Möle, France 1799 February 21 

8A 31

American Convention of 1800: "Opinion of William Rawle in regard to Moses, a manumitted slave" 1799 November 2 

8A 32

American Convention of 1800: credentials of delegates 1800 

8A 33

American Convention of 1801: Minutes and committee reports 1801 June 3-6 

8B 1

American Convention of 1801: Reports from the Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania abolition societies 1801 May 5-23 

8B 2

American Convention of 1801: "Draft of a Constitution for the Convention" 1801 

8B 3

American Convention of 1801: Abstract and complete copy of "The Legislation of New York passed April 8, 1801 respecting slaves" 1801 

8B 4

American Convention of 1801: "An account on the state of negroes in east Jersey" undated 

8B 5

American Convention of 1801: Credentials of delegates 1801 

8B 6

American Convention of 1801: Passport given under the hand of Toussaint L'Ouveture to Mlle. Félicité bound for Philadelphia 1800 May 5 

8B 7

American Convention of 1801: Legal opinions of William Lewis, William Rawle, and Joseph Hopkinson on the proper procedure for registering slaves 1801 August 21 

8B 8

American Convention of 1801: "John Hoskin's certificate on behalf of William and Dido Bowen" circa 1801 

8B 9

American Convention of 1801: Contract for rooms in Gray's Alley between American Convention and Ann Hill 1801August 3 

8B 10

American Convention of 1801: List of books and papers in the possession of the Convention 1794-1801 

8B 11

American Convention of 1803: Minutes and committee reports 1803 January 10-14 

8B 12

American Convention of 1803: Reports from the Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania Abolition Societies 1803 

8B 13

American Convention of 1803: "List of books and papers belonging to the American Convention…" 1803 

8B 14

American Convention of 1803: Bills of sale to Jeremiah Chambers and John Chance, each purchasing half interest in the sloop Martin 1802 

8B 15

American Convention of 1804: Minutes and committee reports 1804 January 9-13 

8B 16

American convention of 1804: Bill of sale to Thomas Harrison and Isaac T. Hopper for the sloop Rebecca 1804 February 1 

8B 17

American Convention of 1804: "Deposition of Jane Field---about her son Peter---with Thomas Ogle---the coachmaker" 1804 October 30 

8B 18

American Convention of 1805: Minutes and committee reports 1805 January 14-17 

8B 19

American onvention of 1805: Reports from the Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania abolition societies 1805 

8B 20

American Convention of 1805: Contractual agreement involving a debt owed Samuel Messen by George Harding 1804 August 28 

8B 21

American Convention of 1805: Case of Jean Baptiste Lapointe vs. Marie Louise, or Marinette, and her daughter Melanie 1805 March 30 

8B 22

American Convention of 1809: Minutes 1809 January 9-12 

8B 23

American Convention of 1809: Reports from the Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania Abolition Societies 1809 

8B 24

American Convention of 1809: "Resolve of the House of Representatives of the U.S." 1809 February 18 

8B 25

American Convention of 1809: "Account of a wonderful talent for arithmetical calculations in and African slave living in Virginia by Benjamin Rush, MD" undated 

8B 26

American convention of 1809: "Case of John Dowers, negro" 1809 December 

8B 27

American Convention of 1809: "Cases in admiralty, slave ships" 1808 August 

8B 28

American convention of 1809: List of various slaves purchased in the vicinity of Bloomingdal "near New York" 1809 

8B 29

American Convention of 1809: Court summons for Henry Steward and Rudolph Boy; and Thomas Harrison 1796, 1808 

8B 30

American Convention of 1812: Minutes and committee reports 1812 January 13-16 

8B 31

American Convention of 1812: Report from the New York Manumission Society 1812 January 3 

8B 32

American Convention of 1812: "An act supplementary to and act entitled 'An Act Respecting Slaves' passed at Trenton, New Jersey" 1812 February 1 

8B 33

American Convention of 1812: "Affidavit of Catherine Richardson" 1811 May 27 

8B 34

American convention of 1812: "Robert Vaux's notification of the meeting of the Convention of 1812" 1811 October 3 

8B 35

American Convention of 1815: Minutes 1815 January 9 

8B 36

American Convention of 1815: Report from the Pennsylvania Abolition Society 1815 

8B 37

American Convention of 1825: Minutes and committee reports 1825 October 4-8 

8B 38

American Convention of 1825: Resolutions of the convention 1825 

8B 39

American Convention of 1826: Minutes and committee reports 1826 October 25-28 

8B 40

American Convention of 1826: Reports from the Manumission and Emigration Society of Loudon County, Virginia; the New York Manumission Society; and the Western Pennsylvania Abolition Society 1826 

8B 41

American Convention of 1826: Credentials of delegates (New York) 1826 

8B 42

American Convention of 1826: Papers relating to the case of Nicholas Young 1825 December 31 

8B 43

American Convention of 1826: Extract from the will of Dr. Sluyter Bouchell of North Carolina; and a certified copy of the will of Thomas Buckmaster of Kent County, Delaware 1796 May 14, 1826 

8B 44

American Convention of 1826: Memorandum of a debt owed John Brown by Frederick Harris, "a man of colour" 1826 July 20 

8B 45

American Convention of 1827: Minutes 1827 October 2-6 

9A 1

American Convention of 1827: Committee reports 1827 

9A 2

American Convention of 1827: Reports from the Delaware Free Labor Society; the Maryland Anti-Slavery Convention; the New York Manumission Society; the Pennsylvania Abolition Society; and the Salem (Ohio) Abolition and Colonization Society 1827 

9A 3

American Convention: Report from the Delaware Abolition Society 1827 September 19 

9A 4

American Convention of 1827: Constitution of the Free Produce Society of Pennsylvania circa 1827 

9A 5

American Convention of 1827: "Copy of a circular addressed to a member of 29 societies and mailed at Philadelphia" 1827 August 11 

9A 6

American Convention of 1827: Credentials of delegates (Virginia Convention) 1827 

9A 7

American Convention of 1828: Minutes, November 1828 November 3-6 

9A 8

American Convention of 1828: Reports from the Maryland Anti-Slavery Convention; the Manumission Society of Tennessee; and the Virginia Convention for the Abolition of Slavery 1828 

9A 9

American Convention of 1828: Report from the Manumission Society of North Carolina circa 1828 

9A 10

American Convention of 1828: Credentials of delegates 1828 

9A 11

American Convention of 1829: Minutes and committee reports 1829 

9A 12

American Convention of 1836: Resolutions and committee reports 1836 

9A 13

American Convention: Correspondence, incoming [see Appendix B, part 4 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1797-1798, 1800, 1804, 1812, 1819, 1825 

9A 14

American Convention: Correspondence, incoming [see Appendix B, part 4 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1826 

9A 15

American Convention: Correspondence, incoming [see Appendix B, part 4 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1827 

9A 16

American Convention: Correspondence, incoming [see Appendix B, part 4 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1828-1829, 1832-1833, 1836 

9A 17

American Convention: Correspondence, outgoing [see Appendix B, part 5 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1797 

9A 18

American Convention: Correspondence, outgoing [see Appendix B, part 5 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1825-1829, 1833, 1835-1836 

9A 19

American convention treasurer: financial papers 1797, 1806, 1827-1828, undated 

9A 20

American convention: "accounts of Jonas Preston, treasurer of the American Convention of Abolition Societies" 1820-1834 

9A 21

American convention: acting committee minutes 1826, 1828 

9B 1

American convention: acting committee resolutions Undated 

9B 2

American convention: acting committee notes and reports 1804, 1817, 1825, 1834 

9B 3

American convention: acting committee treasurer's reports on expenses 1834, undated 

9B 4

American convention: acting committee treasurer: bills 1810-1833 

9B 5

American convention: acting committee treasurer: bills 1810-1833 

9B 6

American convention: acting committee treasurer: bills 1810-1833 

9B 7

American convention: acting committee treasurer: bills 1810-1833 

9B 8

American convention: acting committee: list of members Undated 

9B 9

American convention: lists of societies and delegates 1829, undated 

9B 10

American convention: acting committee: "Rules for the Government of the Acting Committee" Undated 

9B 11

American Convention: Miscellaneous addresses, memorials, and related materials [see Appendix B, part 6 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1794-1795 

9B 12

American Convention: Miscellaneous addresses, memorials, and related materials [see Appendix B, part 6 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1796 

9B 13

American Convention: Miscellaneous addresses, memorials, and related materials [see Appendix B, part 6 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1797-1798 

9B 14

American Convention: Miscellaneous addresses, memorials, and related materials [see Appendix B, part 6 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1800-1801 

9B 15

American Convention: Miscellaneous addresses, memorials, and related materials [see Appendix B, part 6 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1804-1813 

9B 16

American Convention: Miscellaneous addresses, memorials, and related materials [see Appendix B, part 6 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1826-1832 

9B 17

American Convention: Miscellaneous addresses, memorials, and related materials [see Appendix B, part 6 of microfilm guide for item inventory] Undated 

9B 18

American convention: broadsides and printed materials 1797-1804 

10A 1

American convention: broadsides and printed materials 1806-1828 

10A 2

American convention essay: "essay on slavery " by George Brown Undated 

10A 3

American convention essay: "slavery and slaveholders: the natural effects of slavery on the slaveholders" by Virginius (George Browne) Undated 

10A 4

American convention essay and address to the citizens of the United States, author unknown Undated 

10A 5

American convention notes on admiralty court cases 1812 

10A 6

American convention: affidavit of William G. Lucas sworn before Daniel Raymond, Baltmore 1830 

10A 7

American convention: slave narrative, author unknown Undated 

10A 8

American Convention: Assorted materials [see appendix B, part 7 of microfilm guide for item inventory] undated 

10A 9
Volume

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society minute book 1833-1838 

AmS .25
Box Folder

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society minutes 1833-1870 

10B 1

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society board of managers minutes 1833-1841 

10B 2

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society correspondence, incoming [see appendix B, part 8 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1834 

11A 1

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society broadsides: "Festival of the friends of freedom" 1867 

11A 2

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society correspondence, incoming [see appendix B, part 8 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1835 

11A 3

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society correspondence, incoming [see appendix B, part 8 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1836 

11A 4

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society incoming correspondence [see appendix B, part 8 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1837 

11A 5
Oversize

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society: Letter, Juliana A. Tappen to Mary Grew 1837 June 22 

Flat file 3
Box Folder

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society correspondence, incoming [see appendix B, part 8 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1838 

11A 6

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society correspondence, incoming [see appendix B, part 8 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1839-1841 

11A 7

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society correspondence, incoming [see appendix B, part 8 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1842-1846 

11A 8

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society correspondence, incoming [see appendix B, part 8 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1847, 1849 

11A 9

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society correspondence, incoming [see appendix B, part 8 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1850-1853 

11A 10

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society correspondence, outgoing [see appendix B, part 8 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1849 

11A 11

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society letter with a listing of the "names of persons to whom petitions have been sent." John Whittien (New York) to Mary Grew (Philadelphia) 1837 

11A 12

Young Men's Anti-Slavery Society committee reports 1836-1837 

11B 1

Young Men's Anti-Slavery Society correspondence, incoming [see appendix B, part 9 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1834, 1836-1837, undated 

11B 2

Young Men's Anti-Slavery Society treasurer: financial records 1835-1838 

11B 3

Young Men's Anti-Slavery Society of Philadelphia minutes, and a printed declaration 1846 

11B 4

South Mulberry Ward (Philadelphia) Anti-Slavery Society minutes 1837 

11B 5

Bache Institute accounts Undated 

11B 6

Society of Friends, Philadelphia yearly meeting committee on requited labor correspondence, incoming [see appendix B, part 10 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1838 July-August 

11B 7

"An address on the duty of abstaining from slave produce" by Lewis C. Gunn 1838 

11B 8

American Free Produce Association correspondence, incoming [see appendix B, part 11 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1838-1840 

11B 9

American Free Produce Association list of the association's officers, and a portion of a speech Undated 

11B 10

Friends, Society of Philadelphia yearly meeting committee on requited labor minutes and report 1839 

11B 11

Young Men's Anti-Slavery Society membership list Undated 

11B 12

American Free Produce Association correspondence, incoming [see appendix B, part 11 of microfilm guide for item inventory] 1838-1840 

11B 13

American Free Produce Association subscription circulars 1839 

11B 14

American Free Produce Association resolutions Undated 

11B 15

Address from the Philadelphia Anti-Slavery Society to the American Anti-Slavery Society Undated 

11B 16

Young Men's Anti-Slavery Society "Constitution, by-laws, and list of officers of the Young Men's Anti-Slavery Society of the city and county of Philadelphia. Instituted April, 1835." 1835 

11B 17

Friends, Society of Philadelphia yearly meeting committee on required labor minutes 1839 

11B 18

Friends, Society of Philadelphia yearly meeting committee on required labor minutes 1837-1839 

11B 19
Volume

Journal C of Station Number 2 of the Underground Railroad (Philadelphia, agent William Still) and Vigilance Committee of Philadelphia accounts 

AmS .232

13th Ward Republican Club of Philadelphia, constitution and minutes 

AmS .27

13th Ward Republican Club of Phildelphia, minutes, 1856-1859 1856-1859 

AmS .271
Box Folder

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Assorted deeds 1832, 1866, 1869, 1874, 1876, 1881-1882, 1886, 1890, 1892, 1894, 1897-1900 

12B 1

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Assorted deeds [photocopies] undated 

12B 2

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Monthly teacher's report froms for state of South Carolina 1890-1891 

12B 3

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Visitor and post office forms 1879-1899, 1911, undated 

12B 4

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Building specifications undated 

12B 5

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Teacher M. Antoinette O'Neil partial resumé 1913 December 19 

12B 6

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Teacher and pupil background notes, teacher lesson plans and salaries undated 

12B 7

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Fire insurance policies 1885-1886, 1911 

12B 8

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Assorted legal documents, receipts, photograph and negatives of school building 1885, 1888, 1898, 1913 

12B 9

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Assorted photographs of teachers and students 1913 

12B 10

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Lee Royal D.S., abstract regarding plot of land in "Greenwich Commons" in Mount Pleasant, SC 1919 

12B 11

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Assorted letters from the Commissioner of Internal Revenue regarding tax status of school 1926, 1928, 1942 

12B 12

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Newspaper clippings and calling card for Frank L. Neall signed by Henry W. Wilbur 1913 

12B 13

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Last will and testament of Jonathan D. Nixon 1926, 1929 

12B 14

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Assorted correspondence and photograph of teacher with students 1954, 1979-1986 

12B 15

Laing School of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Assorted correspondence, color slides, school newspaper, and map of school 1979-1981 

12B 16

Cover sheet for an address of the committee for improving the condition of the free blacks 1791 

12B 17

Certificate of employment for Issac Tittit from Eaum Newby, 1795 

12B 18

13th Ward Republican Club of Philadelphia resolution on the people's convention of 1859 [removed from AmS .271] 1859 

12B 19

William Still, Charles Wise, Passmore Williamson: A.L.S to unknown correspondent, soliciting funds to support escaped slaves 1854 August 30 

12B 20

Republican association, 13th ward printed constitution [removed from AmS .27] 1856 

12B 21

Charter amendment and drafts 1900 

12B 22

Address to __________ from the American Convention undated 

12B 23

Assorted press releases and clippings 1987 

12B 24

Assorted correspondence, pamphlets and brochures, grant application, curriculum vitae, and studio photograph of unidentified African-American man undated 

12B 25

Schussheim study "Negroes of Early Philadelphia: Roots of Today's Struggle" by Hanna L. Schussheim under the direction of Dr. Ira Reid 1968 

12B 26

Allone Doll Company: Assorted photographs 1926, 1928 

12B 27
Oversize

Assorted award certificates 1975-1976 

Flat file 6
Volume

Report from the New York Society…made to delegates of abolitions societies 1797 

AmS .228

Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society Executive Committee Minutes 1856-1870 

AmS .231

Junior Anti-Slavery Society of Philadelphia minute book 1836-1846 

AmS .245

Abolition Society of Delaware minute book 1801-1819 

AmS .421
Box Box

Photocopies of manuscript collection [AmS .02] undated 

28-35 24-27

Return to Table of Contents »